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How can I convert A

A <- c(1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9)

to B

B <- c(0,0,1,2,3,0,0,4,5,6,0,0,7,8,9)

I tried this:

A <-c(1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9)
rows <- length(A)/3
dim(a) <- c(rows,3)
B <- matrix(0,rows,2+3)
B[,3:5] <- A

c(B)

but it doesn't work.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Why not to transform B with A:

b <- rep(c(0,0,1,1,1),time=length(A)/3)
b[b==1] <- A
b
[1] 0 0 1 2 3 0 0 4 5 6 0 0 7 8 9
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Nice. This works very well and is insightful. –  PascalvKooten Dec 16 '12 at 18:12
    
Why did you use the function unlist? –  tyranitar Dec 16 '12 at 18:31
    
you're right! without it works ! I update my answer! –  agstudy Dec 16 '12 at 18:34

Assuming that A has nonzero length and has length divisible by 3:

> c(vapply(seq(length(A)/3)-1,
           function(x) c(0,0,A[(x*3+1):(x*3+3)]),
           numeric(3+2)
          )
   )
 [1] 0 0 1 2 3 0 0 4 5 6 0 0 7 8 9
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It's not the prettiest line of code, but something like this should work too:

as.vector(sapply(split(A, rep(1:(length(A)/3), each = 3)), 
                 function(x) c(0, 0, x)))
# [1] 0 0 1 2 3 0 0 4 5 6 0 0 7 8 9

First, we split the vector into sets of 3, then append two zeros to each set, and reconvert it to a vector.


Update

Here is an approach that is probably similar to the process you were thinking of:

A <- c(1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9)      # Your vector
dim(A) <- c(3, 3)              # As a matrix
B <- matrix(0, nrow=5, ncol=3) # An empty matrix to fill
B[c(3:5), ] <- A               # We only want to fill these rows
dim(B) <- NULL                 # Remove the dims to get back to a vector
B                              # View your handiwork
# [1] 0 0 1 2 3 0 0 4 5 6 0 0 7 8 9
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Build a receiving vector to be 5/3 the length of the original and fill in the correct entires calculated with modulo arithmetic:

> bb <- vector(length= length(A)*1.67) # Will initially be logical vector
> bb[ !seq_along(bb) %% 5 %in% 1:2 ] <- A    # FALSE entries coerced to 0
> bb
 [1] 0 0 1 2 3 0 0 4 5 6 0 0 7 8 9

The positions at modulo remainder 3,4,and 0 get sequentially filled with the values in A.

Here's another vectorized solution that is probably more in the spirit of your earlier efforts:

> c( rbind( matrix(0, nrow=2, ncol=length(A)/3), 
      matrix(A, nrow=3) ) )
 [1] 0 0 1 2 3 0 0 4 5 6 0 0 7 8 9

And this shows that your solution was correct except for using column indexing when you should have been using row indexing on the LHS of the matrix assignment:

> B <- matrix(0, 5, 3)
> B[3:5, ] <- A
> B
     [,1] [,2] [,3]
[1,]    0    0    0
[2,]    0    0    0
[3,]    1    4    7
[4,]    2    5    8
[5,]    3    6    9
> c(B)
 [1] 0 0 1 2 3 0 0 4 5 6 0 0 7 8 9
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Silly function I wrote for this, with some customizable features:

PastingZeros <- function (divide = 3, data = A, amountofzeros = 2) {
  B     <- NULL
  n     <- length(data)
  index <- 1:n

  for (i in 1:(n / divide)) {
    B     <- c(B, rep(0, amountofzeros), data[index[1:divide]])
    index <- index[-1:-divide]
  }
  return(B)
}

PastingZeros(3, A, 0)
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I don't see a solution that does not assume that A has a length that is a multiple of 3, so I'll throw one:

insert.every <- function(x, insert, every)
    unlist(lapply(split(x, (seq_along(x)-1) %/% every), append, x = insert),
           use.names = FALSE)

insert.every(1:9, c(0,0), 3)
# [1] 0 0 1 2 3 0 0 4 5 6 0 0 7 8 9
insert.every(1:9, c(0,0), 4)
# [1] 0 0 1 2 3 4 0 0 5 6 7 8 0 0 9
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