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Okay I'm just about ready to give up on this.

I would like to save the state of a continuation (done using shift). However, the caveat is that the code AFTER the reset should not be executed. Consider the continuation being executed by worker thread, and should no longer be processed. The continuation is saved in a global list of continuations that can be resumed, and everything else after it is disregarded and should not execute.

The worker thread must survive (it cannot be aborted, or destroyed requiring the spinning up of a new thread).

reset {
  shift {
    (cont:Unit=>Unit) =>
      println(1)
      suspend() // how would I implement something like this?
      cont()
  }

  println(3)
}

println(2)

should yield

1

resuming the continuation should then yield

3
2

At the moment this does not seem possible at all, since the continuation is limited to the scope of the reset. But I figured I'll give StackOverflow one crack at it.


Edit: Basically... (maybe I should have put this earlier) I want to call a method, and suspend execution until it is ready to give me a result, and I want to achieve this over an evented loop, not thread synchronization.

share|improve this question
    
Hm, I think it is not possible this way, but what's the problem to extend scope of reset? Do you know about cpsParam annotation, which allows to use shift inside method, which doesn't have reset at all, so that when call to this method appear inside some reset it will work expected way? Also you could use nested resets. –  Andrii Polishchuk Dec 16 '12 at 18:42
    
I can extend scope of reset, but the code that is being written within the reset will be done by 3rd parties, and thus I have no control over the code, and putting @cpsParam might not be feasible/convenient. –  Daryl Teo Dec 17 '12 at 3:28

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm not sure, whether this is applicable to your situation, but here is example of how to mix multiple resets:

  type Proc = Unit => Unit

  val resume = reset {
    shift { k1: Proc =>
      reset {
        shift { k2: Proc =>
          println(1)
          () => k2(); k1() 
        }        
        println(3)
      }
    }
    println(2)
  }
  // 1

  resume()
  // 3
  // 2

Update: And here is how to use this with methods:

  def f(): Unit @cpsParam[Unit, () => Unit] = {
    println(0)

    shift { k1: Proc =>
      reset {
        shift { k2: Proc =>
          println(1)
          () => k2(); k1()
        }        
        println(2)
      }
    }

    println(3)
  }

  val continue = reset {
    println(-1)
    f()
    println(4)
  }

  println("...")

  continue()

Prints:

-1
0
1
...
2
3
4

And here is what to do if you don't want to suspend everything after call to f until the ending of reset:

  reset {
    println(-1)
    shift { k: Proc =>
      reset{f()}()
      k()
    }
    println(4)
  }

  println("...")

Prints:

-1
0
1
2
3
4
...
share|improve this answer
    
I feel this moves me in the right direction. Is it absolutely necessary to put @cpsParam on all methods down the call stack though? Would there be a more convenient method? –  Daryl Teo Dec 17 '12 at 4:02
    
Only on those, which contain naked shifts or another methods, annotated like this. It is needed for static typing - otherwise compiler couldn't know in which type your shifted control-flow will end up, and it is needed for cps transformation - otherwise compiler wouldn't transform method in continuation passing style. But you can often avoid writing return type at all, and type inference will get it with correct annotation. –  Andrii Polishchuk Dec 17 '12 at 5:21
    
Well I haven't made much progress going down this path, and indeed it seems that there doesn't seem to be an existing solution for what I'm attempting so I'm shelving it. Thanks for the answer anyway. –  Daryl Teo Dec 18 '12 at 6:40

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