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I need to implement a messaging system on a web application. It's powered by PHP and MySQL and will allow registered users to message one another.

So here's my worry: What will happen after i let the site run for two years and it gets thousands of users with dozens of friends who will each send each other millions of messages over the time?

How are the "big boys" of the IT industry handling those problems, for example Facebook? Surely their messages cannot all fit into one table (MySQL or otherwise)... But even transferring older messages in (one) archive table won't work forever.

I will in no way build a website that will be even remotely comparable to Facebook, but i still want a solution that won't bug out after a year or two.

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closed as not constructive by Kermit, Dagon, Jocelyn, AVD, Ed Heal Dec 23 '12 at 7:33

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1  
Why do you think that we never hear of companies like Facebook closing down data centers? They only build more and more and more and more... –  Lix Dec 16 '12 at 19:32
    
mysql can handle a table of several TB (depending on OS) so dont worry –  Dagon Dec 16 '12 at 19:33
1  
By the time you're large enough to have that much data, you will also surely have a trained and qualified DBA on hand to help you figure out the best solutions going forward, be it sharding, replication, denormalization, or switching to a different database. –  Charles Dec 16 '12 at 19:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Make a search for Max Value for SQL BIGINT. This script used to overflow when I wrote it a few years ago on a 32-bit machine. It's much less of a problem now!

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/numeric-type-overview.html

http://www.laprbass.com/RAY_integer_overflow.php

<?php // RAY_integer_overflow.php
error_reporting(E_ALL);
echo "<pre>\n";

// CONNECTION AND SELECTION VARIABLES FOR THE DATABASE
$db_host = "localhost"; // PROBABLY THIS IS OK
$db_name = "??";        // GET THESE FROM YOUR HOSTING COMPANY
$db_user = "??";
$db_word = "??";

// OPEN A CONNECTION TO THE DATA BASE SERVER
// MAN PAGE: http://us2.php.net/manual/en/function.mysql-connect.php
if (!$dbcx = mysql_connect("$db_host", "$db_user", "$db_word"))
{
   $errmsg = mysql_errno() . ' ' . mysql_error();
   echo "<br/>NO DB CONNECTION: ";
   echo "<br/> $errmsg <br/>";
}

// SELECT THE MYSQL DATA BASE
// MAN PAGE: http://us2.php.net/manual/en/function.mysql-select-db.php
if (!$db_sel = mysql_select_db($db_name, $dbcx))
{
   $errmsg = mysql_errno() . ' ' . mysql_error();
   echo "<br/>NO DB SELECTION: ";
   echo "<br/> $errmsg <br/>";
   die('NO DATA BASE');
}

// CREATE A TABLE AND ALTER IT TO A HIGH INDEX NUMBER
$sql = "CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE noise ( id BIGINT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY ) ENGINE=MEMORY";
if (!$res = mysql_query($sql)) die(mysql_error());

$sql = "ALTER TABLE noise AUTO_INCREMENT = 2147483646";
if (!$res = mysql_query($sql)) die(mysql_error());


// INSERT DATA TO ADD TO THE AUTO_INCREMENT INDEX
$kount = 0;
while ($kount < 15)
{
   $sql = "INSERT INTO noise () VALUES ()";
   if (!$res = mysql_query($sql)) die(mysql_error());
   $nid = mysql_insert_id($dbcx);
   var_dump($nid);
   $kount++;
}

According to my rough calculations, if you're aggregating messages at the rate of 1,000 per second and you're using UNSIGNED BIGINT for your AUTO_INCREMENT key, you will experience an overflow in about 570,000,000 years. So it follows, more or less, that if you're collecting the messages at the rate of 1,000,000,000 per second, you'll have a problem in shorter order - perhaps around 570 years from now. But the good news is that if you're collecting messages at the rate of even 100,000 per second, the VC community will be throwing money at you!

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Heads up! Future versions of PHP are deprecating and removing the mysql_ family of functions. Now would be a great time to switch your example code to PDO or mysqli. –  Charles Dec 16 '12 at 19:37
    
@Charles mysql_ functions are officially deprecated. –  Kermit Dec 16 '12 at 20:11
    
@njk, as of 5.5, yes, thus the "future versions" wording. –  Charles Dec 16 '12 at 20:14

The "big boys" use sharding. On the most basic level, this would be putting users that begin with the letter "A" on db server "A", "B" on "B", etc. But to be clear, the "big boys" have many billions of messages, not millions. MySQL should do just fine with hundreds of millions of records. Your queries may get slow if not designed right.

I once created a messaging system that processed about 50 million messages per month and was based on MySQL. We only kept the past 3 months "active", anything older was in an archive area that was a little slower to access.

Honestly, if you can design a system that won't need some babysitting 2 years out, you're awesome!

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In the first step partition the tables (on date, user id, region or any other basis depending on your design). I am sure you can go along with this solution a long way. The next step will be shard your messaging system. Even after this change, you can go for HBase like facebook.

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