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string scriviNumeroMinoreMille(int a)
{
    vector<string> v_zero_to_nineteen(20);
    vector<string> v_twenty_to_ninety(8);

    v_zero_to_nineteen = {"zero", "uno", "due", "tre", "quattro", "cinque", "sei", "sette", "otto", "nove", "dieci", "undici",
                          "dodici", "tredici", "quattordici", "quindici", "sedici", "diciassette", "diciotto", "diciannove"};

    v_twenty_to_ninety = {"venti", "trenta", "quaranta", "cinquanta", "sessanta", "settanta", "ottanta", "novanta"};

    string risultato;

    if(a == 0)
    {
        return risultato = "";
    }
    else if(a < 20 && a > 0)
    {
        return risultato = v_zero_to_nineteen[a];
    }
    else if(a == 20 || a == 30 || a == 40 || a == 50 || a == 60 || a == 70 || a == 80 || a == 90)
    {
        return risultato = v_twenty_to_ninety[(a/10)-2];
    }
    else if(a == 100)
    {
        return risultato = "cento";
    }

    int unita = 0;
    int decine = 0;
    int centinaia = 0;

    if(a > 99)
    {
        centinaia = a/100;
        risultato += (v_zero_to_nineteen[centinaia]);
        risultato += "cento";
    }
    if(a > 19)
    {
        if(a-(centinaia*100)%10 == 0)
        {
            decine = (a-(centinaia*100))/10;
            risultato += (v_twenty_to_ninety[decine-2]);
        }
        else
        {
            decine = (a-(centinaia*100)/10);
            risultato += v_twenty_to_ninety[decine-2];
            unita = (a-(centinaia*100)-(decine*10));
            risultato += v_zero_to_nineteen[unita];
        }
    }
    return risultato;
}

I made this function to check a number from 0 to 999 to convert a number in a string. The result would be for example if the input is 100, the output would be "one hundred" (it's translated in italian)

I don't understand why in debugging the arguments inside these two if clauses:

if(a > 99)
{
    centinaia = a/100;
    risultato += (v_zero_to_nineteen[centinaia]);
    risultato += "cento";
}
if(a > 19)
{
    if(a-(centinaia*100)%10 == 0)
    {
        decine = (a-(centinaia*100))/10;
        risultato += (v_twenty_to_ninety[decine-2]);
    }
    else
    {
        decine = (a-(centinaia*100)/10);
        risultato += v_twenty_to_ninety[decine-2];
        unita = (a-(centinaia*100)-(decine*10));
        risultato += v_zero_to_nineteen[unita];
    }
}

are not considered in the function. Those two ifs are just skipped. I don't understand why. If I put 123 as the input those ifs are skipped. But the condition is if(a > 99), 120 is more than 99. I don't understand.

share|improve this question

closed as too localized by pst, Raymond Chen, WhozCraig, Mark, Fraser Dec 16 '12 at 20:58

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
What have you done to find the problem? For example, did you try to put std::cout << a right before the if (a > 99) line, to check what the actual value of a is? –  Paul Manta Dec 16 '12 at 19:40
    
How do you know they are skipped? What value is passed to the function for a (and how do you know)? What output do you expect, and what do you see? –  Adam Liss Dec 16 '12 at 19:44
    
I used the debugging functions of docblocks. There is a window "Watches" that tells you the value of the variable at every line of the program. And before the ifs statements that are not considered by the function i'm sure that the var a is equal to the same number I input. It's not a problem of the variable value. @AdamLiss I input a number like 123 that is more than 99 in the ifs statement, and the argument in the statement is not executed. –  Paolo Caponeri Dec 16 '12 at 19:46
    
return risultato = "" is redundant. Just say return ""; you don't need to assign "" to a variable. –  MSalters Dec 16 '12 at 19:46
    
Try a code-review site or isolate the problem further: if an adequate summary can't fit in the title .. (Why would an if be outside a function? Even if it could, why would this placement matter? Clearly the title is not adequate for this "question"/problem!) –  user166390 Dec 16 '12 at 20:03
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1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

there are several errors in your code:

First the += operator of the string type takes a "const string&", so instead of doing this:

risultato += (v_twenty_to_ninety[decine-2])

you need to pass it like this:

risultato += v_twenty_to_ninety[decine-2].c_str();

also here

decine = (a-(centinaia*100)/10);

you are using "centinaia" which at this point is zero because you only made the calculation inside the if(a > 99) if block and also the /10 should be outside the parentesis like this:

decine = (a-(centinaia*100))/10

So you need to move this centinaia = a/100; outside the if, so all 3 if statement gets the calculated variable (same with the other two).

this:

int unita = 0;
int decine = 0;
int centinaia = a/100;

to this:

int centinaia = a/100;
int decine    = (a-(centinaia*100))/10;
int unita     = (a-(centinaia*100)-(decine*10));

I made this changes to your method, It now look like this:

string scriviNumeroMinoreMille(int a)
{
    vector<string> v_zero_to_nineteen(20);
    vector<string> v_twenty_to_ninety(8);

    v_zero_to_nineteen = {"zero", "uno", "due", "tre", "quattro", "cinque", "sei", "sette", "otto", "nove", "dieci", "undici",
                          "dodici", "tredici", "quattordici", "quindici", "sedici", "diciassette", "diciotto", "diciannove"};

    v_twenty_to_ninety = {"venti", "trenta", "quaranta", "cinquanta", "sessanta", "settanta", "ottanta", "novanta"};

    string risultato;

    if(a == 0)
    {
        return risultato = "";
    }
    else if(a < 20 && a > 0)
    {
        return risultato = v_zero_to_nineteen[a];
    }
    else if(a == 20 || a == 30 || a == 40 || a == 50 || a == 60 || a == 70 || a == 80 || a == 90)
    {
        return risultato = v_twenty_to_ninety[(a/10)-2];
    }
    else if(a == 100)
    {
        return risultato = "cento";
    }

    int centinaia = a/100;
    int decine    = (a-(centinaia*100))/10;
    int unita     = (a-(centinaia*100)-(decine*10));

    if(a > 99)
    {

       risultato += v_zero_to_nineteen[centinaia].c_str();
       risultato += "cento";


    }
    if(a > 19)
    {
        if(a-(centinaia*100)%10 == 0)
        {
            risultato += v_twenty_to_ninety[decine-2].c_str();
        }
        else
        {
            risultato += v_twenty_to_ninety[decine-2].c_str();

            risultato += v_zero_to_nineteen[unita].c_str();
        }
    }
    return risultato;
}

For the 123 input it outputs "unocentoventitre", I dont know if thats correct since I dont speak italian xD

Hope it helps.

EDIT: forgot to remove/change back the lines I inserted for testing.

share|improve this answer
    
As you correctly mentioned one operator+= for strings takes const string&. So why call .c_str() on the argument to get a const char* to pass into it (the existance of a const char* overload for += means it wont cost that much extra, but still...). –  Grizzly Dec 16 '12 at 21:34
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