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I use SQL Server 2000.

Suppose I have two tables like the following:

Area
----------------------------------
ID| Name   | HierarchyLevel
----------------------------------
1 | World  |     1
2 | America|     2
3 | Europe |     2
4 | Africa |     2
5 | USA    |     3

and

AreaHierarchy
------------------------
ID | ParentID | ChildID
------------------------
 1 |   1      |    2
 2 |   1      |    3
 3 |   1      |    4
 4 |   2      |    5

where

AreaHierarchy.ParentID and AreaHierarchy.ChildID are FKs of Area.ID

How can I find the nth parent of USA?

Is it possible without looping?

Probably not.

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1  
What version of SQL Server? –  OMG Ponies Sep 7 '09 at 18:41
1  
This will become horribly inefficient for a structure of any significant depth. Look into HierarchyID or if you are using older than SQL 2008, look into the Adjacency List Model. –  Rex M Sep 7 '09 at 18:45
    
any version of sql server. –  BROY Sep 7 '09 at 18:45
    
For 'any version' what do you mean. I've not used anything older than SQL Server 2000, but older versions don't even have Stored Procedures, User Defined Functions. What is the oldest version you need to support? Either way, you're going to need a loop or recursion. –  MatBailie Sep 7 '09 at 18:58
    
@Dems, sql server 2000, 2005, 2008. –  BROY Sep 7 '09 at 18:59

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

No loops, no recursion

The best thing is to add additional field in your second table, that would be called ie. Parents and would simply store parent IDs in a string like:

AreaHierarchy
------------------------------------
ID | ParentID | ChildID | Parents
------------------------------------
 1 |    1     |    2    | 1/
 2 |    1     |    3    | 1/
 3 |    1     |    4    | 1/
 4 |    2     |    5    | 1/2/

This way you can easily get to any parent in the branch without recursion or any other complicated procedure. The cost in processing is very small you just copy parent's Parents value and add one more ID. And since you probably need to read more than write/update, this is the best solution to your problem.

And if I were you, I'd just keep one table for the data you have. Join both tables into one. Level could also be computed based on counting slashes in Parents varchar value but I wouldn't recommend doing that.

Additional 'catch' you should be aware of

If your data is mostly reads/writes and much less updates, this structure is really performant. But if your table does a lot more updates than read/writes, you should avoid this technique. Why? Imagine you have a very deep tree with lots of children. Changing a parent of some node high up in near the root would mean you should update Parents of the whole subtree nodes.

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Why use only one table? Querying becomes hard in that way. –  BROY Sep 7 '09 at 19:01
3  
That's true, you could parse the string in the applicaiton. But then you tightly bind the database implementation to the application, which is bad practice in my world. It's all about scale and maintainability though. –  MatBailie Sep 7 '09 at 19:10
1  
Why in the world would one table make queries harder? His structure assumes one parent per node, so it is in no way more complicated. –  Robert Koritnik Sep 7 '09 at 19:11
1  
I agree, having a second table to hold this data is more normalised but superfluous (in my opinion) and certainly doesn't make anything any harder... –  MatBailie Sep 7 '09 at 19:12
1  
that's what I meant. 2 tables = superfluous. 1 table != harder. :) –  MatBailie Sep 7 '09 at 19:18

Should work

CREATE PROCEDURE find_nth_parent 
    @id INT,
    @level INT
AS
BEGIN
    SET NOCOUNT ON;

    DECLARE @counter INT
    SET @counter = 1

    DECLARE @currentItem INT
    DECLARE @currentItemNew INT

    SET @currentItem = @id

    WHILE @counter <= @level
    BEGIN
    	SET @currentItemNew = NULL
    	SELECT @currentItemNew = ParentID FROM AreaHierarchy WHERE ChildId = @currentItem
    	IF @currentItemNew IS NULL
    	BEGIN
    		SELECT NULL
    		RETURN 
    	END
    	SET @currentItem = @currentItemNew
    	SET @counter = @counter + 1
    END
    SELECT @currentItem
END

Calling

EXEC find_nth_parent 5,2

returns 1 which means "World" (2nd parent), calling

EXEC find_nth_parent 5,1

return 2, which means "America" (1st parent).

Hope it helps

share|improve this answer
    
Is it possible without Looping? –  BROY Sep 7 '09 at 18:43
    
it's possible without looping...in that you can create a SQL string with as many levels of joins as you need and then execute that dynamically...pain though –  David Andres Sep 7 '09 at 18:45
    
The is no single query that could do this for "n depth" without using Common Table Experssions. That still has to do recurssion, whcih is essnetially a novel kind of loop. But it avoids T-SQL loops, at which TSQL itself isn't actually that efficient. In CTEs the loop is inside the database engine, which is much much faster... –  MatBailie Sep 7 '09 at 18:55

You could use recursion. If you have SQL Server 2005 or newer you can use Common Table Expressions. If not you realistically need to use User Defined Functions.


An example of a UDF to do that could be...

CREATE FUNCTION get_nth_parent(area_id AS INT, n as INT)
RETURNS INT
AS

IF (n = 0) RETURN area_id

DECLARE @return INT
SELECT
   @return = dbo.get_nth_parent(AreaHierarchy.ParentID, n-1)
FROM
   AreaHierarchy
WHERE
   ChildID = area_id

RETURN @return


An example using Common Table Experessions could be...

DECLARE @hierarchy TABLE (
   parent_id  INT,
   child_id   INT
)
INSERT INTO @hierarchy SELECT 1,2
INSERT INTO @hierarchy SELECT 1,3
INSERT INTO @hierarchy SELECT 1,4
INSERT INTO @hierarchy SELECT 2,5


;WITH
   relative_distance (
      child_id,
      parent_id,
      distance
   )
AS
(
   SELECT
      child_id,
      parent_id,
      1
   FROM
      @hierarchy

   UNION ALL

   SELECT
      [relative_distance].child_id,
      [hierarchy].parent_id,
      [relative_distance].distance + 1
   FROM
      [relative_distance]
   INNER JOIN
      @hierarchy AS [hierarchy]
         ON [hierarchy].child_id = [relative_distance].parent_id
)

SELECT
   parent_id
FROM
   [relative_distance]
WHERE
   child_id = 5
   AND distance = 2
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In SQL Server 2005+, you'd use a CTE in a function:

create function get_parent(@child as int, @parent_level as int)
returns int
as
begin
    declare @parent int

    ;with parentage as (
         select 
             h.parent_id, 
             h.child_id,
             0 as level
         from 
             areahierarchy h
         where
             h.child_id = @child
         union all
         select
             h.parent_id,
             h.child_id,
             p.level + 1 as level
         from
             areahierarchy h
             inner join parentage p on
                 h.parent_id = p.child_id
         where
             p.level < @parent_level
    )

    select @parent = p.child_id from parentage p 
    where level = (select max(level) from parentage)

    return @parent
end
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1  
oh come on, use a better CTE name than "p" and I'll guive you +1! That's just sloppy and lazy :) –  MatBailie Sep 7 '09 at 19:03
    
and while doing it you can omit the semicolon, can't you? –  Robert Koritnik Sep 7 '09 at 19:18
    
No, CTE's need the preceding TSQL statement to terminate with a semi colon (afaik). I guess it's legacy due to other uses of the WITH key word. I'm convinced they could have found a better keyword, but I wasn't there to see why they chose WITH :) –  MatBailie Sep 7 '09 at 19:24
    
don't really know. I've never used semicolons in the past and CTEs worked as well. But I don't know whether there were any sentences before them. Maybe they started my SPs. Yours starts with a declaration. –  Robert Koritnik Sep 7 '09 at 19:26
1  
Changed to be parentage. Also, you can omit the ;, but it's just a force of habit. –  Eric Sep 7 '09 at 19:58

I understand that you want support back to SQL Server 2000, but I think it should be noted that the SQL Server 2008 Hierarchy ID function GetAncestor() does exactly what you're looking for.

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