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How to print in range?

I need to create grid coordinates that look like this:

(  0,   0):  0     (125,   0):  1     (250,   0):  2     (375,   0):  3     (500,   0):  4     (625,   0):  5
(  0, 125):  6     (125, 125):  7     (250, 125):  8     (375, 125):  9     (500, 125): 10     (625, 125): 11
(  0, 250): 12     (125, 250): 13     (250, 250): 14     (375, 250): 15     (500, 250): 16        (625, 250): 17
(  0, 375): 18     (125, 375): 19     (250, 375): 20     (375, 375): 21     (500, 375): 22     (625, 375): 23

(x, y): i

The first line of the programme must be: for i in range 24:

I am only allowed to use i. There must be no more for loops. I am allowed to use 2 prints and one if. Maximum lenght of the programme is 4 lines.

I am a total noob in python. This is just too much for me. It's for a programming class I am lurking around trying to learn something useful. This is their homework for last week.

Would be grateful for any kind of help. Especially if you can present it to me simple-like. :)

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marked as duplicate by inspectorG4dget, bla, Explosion Pills, paulmelnikow, InfantPro'Aravind' Dec 18 '12 at 4:25

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Post up what you've tried and we'll help you get where you need to go. Us giving you our code is not going to help you learn at all –  inspectorG4dget Dec 16 '12 at 19:51
1  
This looks remarkably similar (ie, identical) to a question last week :) –  Jon Clements Dec 16 '12 at 19:56
    
@JonClements: signboarding link, please? –  inspectorG4dget Dec 16 '12 at 19:57
    
I searched all over the place but found nothing like it. And I have nothing at all. Zero. Null. I feel pretty stupid. So far I pretty much managed to learn what they were doing, but this one is utterly uncomprehencible to me. –  user1871015 Dec 16 '12 at 19:58
    
@inspectorG4dget stackoverflow.com/questions/13824771/how-to-print-in-range (that's the first one I found - but there was one from last week - I wasn't even a member when that question was asked!) –  Jon Clements Dec 16 '12 at 19:58

2 Answers 2

(  0,   0):  0  (125,   0):  1  (250,   0):  2  (375,   0):  3  (500,   0):  4  (625,   0):  5  
(  0, 125):  6  (125, 125):  7  (250, 125):  8  (375, 125):  9  (500, 125): 10  (625, 125): 11 
(  0, 250): 12  (125, 250): 13  (250, 250): 14  (375, 250): 15  (500, 250): 16  (625, 250): 17
(  0, 375): 18  (125, 375): 19  (250, 375): 20  (375, 375): 21  (500, 375): 22  (625, 375): 23

Looks like the output you asked for.

Sticking with your requirements of 1 for loop, an if statement and <= 4 lines, I came up with:

for i in range(24):
    if i%6==0 :
        print ''.join(["(%3s, %3s):%3s  "%(x*125, i/6*125 ,x+i) for x in range(6)])

Since you say you are a Python noob, you should know this uses list comprehension which I think is explained well in these links:

http://www.blog.pythonlibrary.org/2012/07/28/python-201-list-comprehensions/

How to read aloud Python List Comprehensions?

Edit: code that fits the description exactly: 1 for loop, 1 if statement, 2 print statements

for i in range(24):
    if i%6==0 and i!=0:
        print ''
    print "(%3s, %3s):%3s "%((i%6)*125, i/6*125 ,i) ,
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He said only one for loop. You have used two in your code –  DeadChex Dec 17 '12 at 1:33
1  
@DeadChex I suppose you are right. Fixed. –  Alex Dec 17 '12 at 2:59

Here you are:

>>> print "\n".join(map("\t".join, [["(%s, %s): %s" % (x*125, y*125, y*6+x) for x in range(6)] for y in range(4)]))
(0, 0): 0       (125, 0): 1     (250, 0): 2     (375, 0): 3     (500, 0): 4     (625, 0): 5
(0, 125): 6     (125, 125): 7   (250, 125): 8   (375, 125): 9   (500, 125): 10  (625, 125): 11
(0, 250): 12    (125, 250): 13  (250, 250): 14  (375, 250): 15  (500, 250): 16  (625, 250): 17
(0, 375): 18    (125, 375): 19  (250, 375): 20  (375, 375): 21  (500, 375): 22  (625, 375): 23

Little bit messy... but result looks like what you need.

P.S. Spreaded

>>> node = lambda x,y: "(%s, %s): %s" % (x*125, y*125, y*6+x)
>>> coords = [[node(x, y) for x in range(6)] for y in range(4)]
>>> print "\n".join(map("\t".join, coords))
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GOOD LORD SPREAD IT UP –  Jakob Bowyer Dec 16 '12 at 20:03
    
must be no more for loops apparently –  Jon Clements Dec 16 '12 at 20:20

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