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i have a file with .raw extension (raw image format), but i cannot open it. i tried to analyze it with the commands file filename.raw, exiv2 print, exiftool, ufraw, dcraw. since it appears to be a binary file, i tried to extract information using strings filename.raw, hexdump and xxd. it is surprising that the file does not appear to have any metadata. i suspect the file extension to be wrong, and the file to be manipulated.

how else can i determine the type? how can i extract any information?

thank you very much for any suggestions.

EDIT: a sample file can be downloaded here.

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It is probably a sequence of {r,g,b} values * nrow * ncolumn. It could even be interlaced. Start by finding out the number of bits per cell. Then try to estimate nrow and ncolumn. Then convert it to a simple format, such as BMP, and inspect the results. Wash, rinse, repeat. –  wildplasser Dec 16 '12 at 23:43
    
Can you post an example file? –  Thomas M. DuBuisson Dec 17 '12 at 0:51

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Hmm... well,

//Judging from the number of bytes in the file:

// 1447600

//This number is exactly.

// 3 x 499 x 967

//Which is very odd, but it means if this is an image, then it must be 3 bytes per pixel and either 499 x 967 or 967 x 499

EDIT: resolution is wrong. Probably bits per channel as well, this is what I get for using bc in the middle of the night instead of WA.

Actual factors are 2^4*5^2*7*11*47, which means it cannot be 3 Bytes per pixel. There might be some stream compression going on? But probably not, the number is too nice.

Looking at some of the data, most of it is quite noisy, which fits with a camera with a noisy digital sensor:

00000000  0e 08 06 02 04 06 00 02  00 04 01 04 0e 03 05 01  |................|
00000010  03 01 06 04 00 03 01 05  01 00 02 00 06 02 04 01  |................|
00000020  00 07 0c 0d 05 01 0a 0d  03 08 11 08 0c 03 06 06  |................|
00000030  08 02 07 04 01 01 07 02  05 06 10 04 07 01 04 02  |................|
00000040  02 01 0c 09 07 02 05 01  0d 04 00 05 0e 01 00 07  |................|
00000050  00 02 04 0a 11 04 07 04  01 00 0d 07 0f 06 03 02  |................|
00000060  06 04 0a 0b 03 08 02 0c  00 08 00 04 06 09 03 03  |................|
00000070  04 00 0a 04 01 06 00 00  02 08 0a 07 04 09 01 0b  |................|
00000080  01 0c 0d 04 03 03 05 00  02 11 09 00 07 08 08 05  |................|
00000090  04 07 02 0c 00 13 01 06  07 02 08 0a 07 05 02 01  |................|

This area, at the beginning of the file, is likely to be close to all black.

So, of the common 3 bytes per pixel formats, you have BGR24, RGB24 or YUV24.

Because it's simpler to deal with RGB or BGR formats, let's whip up some short code to dump this to a png, using libpng.

First try:

#include <png.h>
#include <exception>
#include <memory>

int main() {
  FILE * fpout;
  FILE * fpin;
  png_structp png_ptr = nullptr;
  png_infop info_ptr = nullptr;
  const unsigned width = 499;
  const unsigned height = 967;
  const unsigned channels = 3;

  fpin = fopen("sample.raw", "rb");
  if (!fpin)
    throw std::exception();

  std::unique_ptr<char[]> data(new char[width*height*channels]);
  fread(data.get(), width*height*channels, 1, fpin);
  fclose(fpin);

  fpout = fopen("output.png", "wb");
  if (!fpout)
    throw std::exception();

  png_ptr = png_create_write_struct(PNG_LIBPNG_VER_STRING, nullptr, nullptr, nullptr);
  if (!png_ptr) {
    fclose (fpout);
    throw std::exception();
  }

  info_ptr = png_create_info_struct(png_ptr);
  if (!info_ptr) {
    png_destroy_write_struct(&png_ptr, nullptr);
    fclose (fpout);
    throw std::exception();
  }

  if (setjmp(png_jmpbuf (png_ptr))) {
    png_destroy_write_struct(&png_ptr, &info_ptr);
    fclose (fpout);
    throw std::exception();
  }

  png_set_IHDR(png_ptr,
      info_ptr,
      width,
      height,
      8,
      PNG_COLOR_TYPE_RGB,
      PNG_INTERLACE_NONE,
      PNG_COMPRESSION_TYPE_DEFAULT,
      PNG_FILTER_TYPE_DEFAULT);

  /* Initialize rows of PNG. */

  std::unique_ptr<png_bytep[]> row_ptrs(new png_bytep[height]);
  size_t stride = width * 8 * channels / 8;
  for (size_t i = 0; i < height; ++i) {
    size_t q = i * stride;
    row_ptrs[i] = (png_bytep)data.get() + q;
  }

  /* Write the image data to "fp". */

  png_init_io(png_ptr, fpout);
  png_set_rows(png_ptr, info_ptr, row_ptrs.get());
  png_write_png(png_ptr, info_ptr, PNG_TRANSFORM_IDENTITY, nullptr);

  png_destroy_write_struct(&png_ptr, &info_ptr);
  fclose (fpout);
}

Gives us:

http://i.imgur.com/Iwi3M.jpg

This is heartening, because it seems that we merely have the resolution wrong. So examining the image, it looks like the bar repeats itself every 467 pixels or there abouts. However, it does not look like there is anything interesting in the data. So it's likely not simple RBG or BGR or YUV encoding, otherwise, it would look nicer.

Raw Therapee doesn't recognize it. So, I'm asking you now. What camera did you use to make this?

share|improve this answer
    
i did the following changes to your code: channels=1 and PNG_COLOR_TYPE_GRAY, and the output looks like the desired image. thanks! still, i suspect the .raw file not to be a real raw file as produced by a camera, but rather a reverse-converted fake (e.g. from a tif). any way to find evidence supporting this suspicion? i'll try to get camera model info asap. –  the_ducky Dec 18 '12 at 10:22
    
Well, if you have the picture reconstructed, then congrats. Because there is absolutely no metadata in this file, there is no way of knowing where it came from, tiff is lossless compression, so there isn't any leftover compression artifacts that you can examine. –  OmnipotentEntity Dec 20 '12 at 5:34
    
yes, and the lack of any metadata in a raw file is suspicious. so i'll have to live with that, and focus on the content. btw, it is a orca flash 4 microscope camera. thanks for your quick and expedient help. –  the_ducky Dec 20 '12 at 9:55

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