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data=read.csv("filelocation",header=T)

obs timedate   weight
504 2010-10-04 52495    
505 2010-10-01 53000    
506 2010-09-30 52916    
507 2010-09-29 52785    
508 2010-09-28 53348    
509 2010-09-27 52885    
510 2010-09-24 52174    
511 2010-09-23 51461    
512 2010-09-22 51286    
513 2010-09-21 50968    
514 2010-09-20 49250    

I loaded somedata in R but the data in the CSV file was organized from newest->oldest and I would like to rearranged to newest->oldest. How do I do that? I also tried to formatting the "date" variable so R could recognize the data I am loading as time series inorder to difference/ lag the "weight" variable but I am having no luck. What am I doing wrong? I am using the

timedate=as.Date(data$timedate,"%Y-%m-%d")

Thank you!

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here you go:

R> dat <- read.table(file=textConnection("obs     timedate   Weight
504 2010-10-04  52495   
505 2010-10-01  53000   
506 2010-09-30  52916   
507 2010-09-29  52785   
508 2010-09-28  53348   
509 2010-09-27  52885   
510 2010-09-24  52174   
511 2010-09-23  51461   
512 2010-09-22  51286   
513 2010-09-21  50968   
514 2010-09-20  49250"), header=TRUE)
+ + + + + + + + + + + 
R>

Now parse the date as Date and redisplay for checking:

R> dat$timedate <- as.Date(as.character(dat$timedate))
dat
   obs   timedate  Weight
1  504 2010-10-04  52495
2  505 2010-10-01  53000
3  506 2010-09-30  52916
4  507 2010-09-29  52785
5  508 2010-09-28  53348
6  509 2010-09-27  52885
7  510 2010-09-24  52174
8  511 2010-09-23  51461
9  512 2010-09-22  51286
10 513 2010-09-21  50968
11 514 2010-09-20  49250
R>

And simply reorder by date:

R> dat[order(dat$timedate),]
   obs   timedate  Weight
11 514 2010-09-20  49250
10 513 2010-09-21  50968
9  512 2010-09-22  51286
8  511 2010-09-23  51461
7  510 2010-09-24  52174
6  509 2010-09-27  52885
5  508 2010-09-28  53348
4  507 2010-09-29  52785
3  506 2010-09-30  52916
2  505 2010-10-01  53000
1  504 2010-10-04  52495
R> 
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry Dirk, I edited timdate to timedate in the question so it was consistent. – thelatemail Dec 16 '12 at 23:32
    
Thanks so much Dirk!! So I don't really need to format the "date" variable in the dataset in R by using the as.Date(data$timedate,"%Y-%m-%d")? Does the as.character(dat$timdate) command automatically recognize the format of year-month-day in the date variable? – gabriel Dec 16 '12 at 23:42
    
By default, textual data becomes a so-called factor variable which is why we need as.character() to re-convert before parsing as a date. – Dirk Eddelbuettel Dec 17 '12 at 0:08

You can also set the timedate column as a Date when you import using the colClasses argument.

dat <- read.csv(
                "filelocation",
                header=TRUE,
                colClasses=c("numeric","Date","numeric")
               )

...and then reorder as per @Dirk's suggestion:

dat <- dat[order(dat$timedate),]
share|improve this answer
    
thank you so much latemail! So I can specify that the middle variable is time in the first command as I load the data. Out of curiosity are there any benefits of specifying the "date" variable as a time series? It seems in order to plot one need not specify the variable is time, you always need to specify the x variable in the plot function in order to run: plot(date,weight) – gabriel Dec 16 '12 at 23:51
    
@Gabriel - that's correct. There are lots of benefits such as being able to re-format the date and extract weekdays or months from the field quickly and for doing calculations like the number of days between 2 dates. Also the generation of date sequences - see ?seq.Date – thelatemail Dec 16 '12 at 23:58

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