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Let's say I have an empty class with a virtual function:

class Base
{
public:
    virtual void Foo(){std::cout << "this is the base class";}
}

Then I have a class that inherits from Base and overrides Foo():

class Derived : public Base
{
public:
    void Foo(){std::cout << "this is the derived class";}
}

Then there is some other class that contains a list of Base:

class OtherClass
{
public:
    std::vector<Base> listOfBases; //note it's not std::list<Derived>
}

How do I cycle through the listOfBases and call Foo() for the Derived class not the Base class? Right now if I was to say listOfBases[i].Foo(); then this is the base class would print, but I want the overridden one from the Derived class to print.

I could just make it a list of Derived instead of Base and that would fix it, but I'm going to be calling these inherited class all kinds of different things so I need a list of Base.

So how do I call an overridden function from a list of its base class?

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That's not how inheritance works. Perhaps a basic text book on C++ would provide time well spent? –  Kerrek SB Dec 17 '12 at 0:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You need to use a list of Base* (that is, pointers-to-Base), or preferably, std::unique_ptr<Base> or std::shared_ptr<Base>.

The reason for this is because of the C++ object model and copying. Derived classes must be at least as large as their base class (they can be the same size depending on the derived class being empty or not). Since C++ utilizes copying (or possibly moving in C++11) when adding items to a vector, it must allocate enough space for n Base objects. Since a vector is almost always a wrapper around a simple array, trying to add a (possibly differently sized) Derived object into an array of Base objects is undefined behaviour.

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1  
"[derived classes] can be the same size [as their base] depending on whether the base class is empty or not" - it's whether the derived class is empty that dictates whether sizeof(Base) can equal sizeof(Derived). –  Tony D Dec 17 '12 at 0:57
    
@TonyD Indeed, mental slip. Updated my answer. –  Yuushi Dec 17 '12 at 1:08

Get a pointer to each base class, and then downcast it a Derived class. It's called downcast because in a UML diagram it is conventional to draw the base class above the derived class.

for ( auto q = listOfBases.begin(); q != listOfBases.end(); ++q )
{
    Base* pBase = &(*q); // Get pointer to Base class. Can't downcast on object.
    Derived* pDerived = dynamic_cast<Derived*>(pBase); // Downcast
    pDerived->Foo();   // Call Foo() of Derived
} 
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From the question - "I could just make it a list of Derived instead of Base and that would fix it, but I'm going to be calling these inherited class all kinds of different things so I need a list of Base.". Clearly, you can't assume all container elements are of a particularDerived type. –  Tony D Dec 17 '12 at 1:03

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