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I have a function to check if a number is a square root:

def primeness(n):
    for x in range(2, (n**0.5) + 1):
        if n % x == 0:
            return False
    return True
def main():
    n = input('Type a digit \n')
    if primeness(n):
        print(n, 'is a prime number')
    else:
        print(n, 'is not a prime number')
main()

However whenever I run it I get this error:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "C:/Users/Matt/Desktop/Python Stuff/test.py", line 12, in <module>
main()
  File "C:/Users/Matt/Desktop/Python Stuff/test.py", line 8, in main
if primeness(n):
  File "C:/Users/Matt/Desktop/Python Stuff/test.py", line 2, in primeness
for x in range(2, (n**0.5) + 1):
TypeError: unsupported operand type(s) for ** or pow(): 'str' and 'float'

What am I doing wrong?

share|improve this question
    
You say your testing for square roots but you are testing if the number is prime? –  DeadChex Dec 17 '12 at 1:41
    
O.O You've just blown my mind. n**0.5 is the same as sqrt(n)??!!! I never knew that! :D –  yentup Dec 17 '12 at 3:31
    
@yentup Yeah its a simple mathematical property. the nth root of a is the same as a to the power of 1/n, so the second (or square) root of a number is that number raised to power of 1/2 or 0.5 –  Tutti Frutti Jacuzzi Dec 17 '12 at 4:19

5 Answers 5

in python3, input is the equivalent of the old raw_input. Thus you need to perform a cast and convert it into an integer.

def main():
    n = int(input('Type a digit \n')) #right here
    if primeness(n):
        print(n, 'is a prime number')
    else:
        print(n, 'is not a prime number')

if you can't guarantee that the string will be an integer, you need to either do some casting, such as int(float(input())) or use try-except blocks to process the issue.

share|improve this answer
    
You might want to put a try / except block around int function... –  dawg Dec 17 '12 at 2:06

You must convert from the input string to an int

You may also run into problems with

for x in range(2, (n**0.5) + 1):

n ** 0.5 may return a float number while range requires an integer. Fix it by rounding or casting it to an int

share|improve this answer

input returns a string. not an int. You need to convert it first.

share|improve this answer

You don't need to calculate the square root of n; you can instead calculate the square of x:

def primeness(n):
    x = 2
    while x * x <= n:
        if x % n == 0:
            return False
        x = x + 1
    return True
share|improve this answer
    
This does not solve the problem. Using sqrt works perfectly under normal circumstances. –  Tutti Frutti Jacuzzi Dec 17 '12 at 4:21
    
Of course it works perfectly well to take the square root, as long as you don't mind the conversion to and from real numbers. I was merely trying to point out an alternative, since other responses had already answered the question. There's no need for a downvote. –  user448810 Dec 17 '12 at 5:14
    
Ahh, sorry. I didn't know that you posted this after the question had been answered. If you edit the post I'll be able to cancel my down-vote. –  Tutti Frutti Jacuzzi Dec 17 '12 at 5:31
    
@ValekHalfHeart here you go. :) –  Will Ness Dec 17 '12 at 14:28
python 3.2

#change this line:
for x in range(2, int(n**0.5) + 1):
share|improve this answer
    
You may want to say what to and why, that way the author knows –  DeadChex Dec 17 '12 at 3:38

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