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I have a Java String that contains XML, with no line feeds or indentations. I would like to turn it into a String with nicely formatted XML. How do I do this?

String unformattedXml = "<tag><nested>hello</nested></tag>";
String formattedXml = new [UnknownClass]().format(unformattedXml);

Note: My input is a String. My output is a String.

share|improve this question
    
check this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/1264849/… –  dfa Aug 12 '09 at 8:14
6  
Just curious, are you sending this output to a XML file or something else where the indenting really matters? Some time ago I was very concerned about formatting my XML in order to have it properly displayed... but after spending a bunch of time on this I realized that I had to send my output to a web browser, and any relatively modern web browser will actually display the XML in a nice tree structure, so I could forget about this issue and move on. I'm mentioning this just in case you (or other user with the same problem) could have overlooked the same detail. –  Abel Morelos Oct 6 '10 at 17:21
    
@Abel, saving to text files, inserting into an HTML textareas, and dumping to the console for debugging purposes. –  Steve McLeod Oct 6 '10 at 20:48
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23 Answers

Here's an answer to my own question. I combined the answers from the various results to write a class that pretty prints XML.

No guarantees on how it responds with invalid XML or large documents.

package ecb.sdw.pretty;

import org.apache.xml.serialize.OutputFormat;
import org.apache.xml.serialize.XMLSerializer;
import org.w3c.dom.Document;
import org.xml.sax.InputSource;
import org.xml.sax.SAXException;

import javax.xml.parsers.DocumentBuilder;
import javax.xml.parsers.DocumentBuilderFactory;
import javax.xml.parsers.ParserConfigurationException;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.StringReader;
import java.io.StringWriter;
import java.io.Writer;

/**
 * Pretty-prints xml, supplied as a string.
 * <p/>
 * eg.
 * <code>
 * String formattedXml = new XmlFormatter().format("<tag><nested>hello</nested></tag>");
 * </code>
 */
public class XmlFormatter {

    public XmlFormatter() {
    }

    public String format(String unformattedXml) {
        try {
            final Document document = parseXmlFile(unformattedXml);

            OutputFormat format = new OutputFormat(document);
            format.setLineWidth(65);
            format.setIndenting(true);
            format.setIndent(2);
            Writer out = new StringWriter();
            XMLSerializer serializer = new XMLSerializer(out, format);
            serializer.serialize(document);

            return out.toString();
        } catch (IOException e) {
            throw new RuntimeException(e);
        }
    }

    private Document parseXmlFile(String in) {
        try {
            DocumentBuilderFactory dbf = DocumentBuilderFactory.newInstance();
            DocumentBuilder db = dbf.newDocumentBuilder();
            InputSource is = new InputSource(new StringReader(in));
            return db.parse(is);
        } catch (ParserConfigurationException e) {
            throw new RuntimeException(e);
        } catch (SAXException e) {
            throw new RuntimeException(e);
        } catch (IOException e) {
            throw new RuntimeException(e);
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        String unformattedXml =
                "<?xml version=\"1.0\" encoding=\"UTF-8\"?><QueryMessage\n" +
                        "        xmlns=\"http://www.SDMX.org/resources/SDMXML/schemas/v2_0/message\"\n" +
                        "        xmlns:query=\"http://www.SDMX.org/resources/SDMXML/schemas/v2_0/query\">\n" +
                        "    <Query>\n" +
                        "        <query:CategorySchemeWhere>\n" +
                        "   \t\t\t\t\t         <query:AgencyID>ECB\n\n\n\n</query:AgencyID>\n" +
                        "        </query:CategorySchemeWhere>\n" +
                        "    </Query>\n\n\n\n\n" +
                        "</QueryMessage>";

        System.out.println(new XmlFormatter().format(unformattedXml));
    }

}
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Thank you very much. This saved my day! –  Enno Shioji Jun 10 '10 at 6:32
12  
Just to note that this answer requires the use of Xerces. If you don't want to add this dependency then you can simply use the standard jdk libraries and javax.xml.transform.Transformer (see my answer below) –  khylo Dec 17 '10 at 16:28
    
pretty good. –  Nishant Jan 13 '11 at 18:00
31  
Back in 2008 this was a good answer, but now this can all be done with standard JDK classes rather than Apache classes. See xerces.apache.org/xerces2-j/faq-general.html#faq-6. Yes this is a Xerces FAQ but the answer covers standard JDK classes. The initial 1.5 implementation of these classes had many issues but everything works fine from 1.6 on. Copy the LSSerializer example in the FAQ, chop the "..." bit and add writer.getDomConfig().setParameter("format-pretty-print", Boolean.TRUE); after the LSSerializer writer = ... line. –  George Hawkins May 4 '11 at 8:43
2  
I've created a small class using the example Apache gave, which @GeorgeHawkins gave a link to. It was missing how the variable document was initialized, so I thought I might add in the deceleration and make a quick example out of it. Let me know if I should change something, pastebin.com/XL7932aC –  samwell Jul 16 '12 at 16:52
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Transformer transformer = TransformerFactory.newInstance().newTransformer();
transformer.setOutputProperty(OutputKeys.INDENT, "yes");
//initialize StreamResult with File object to save to file
StreamResult result = new StreamResult(new StringWriter());
DOMSource source = new DOMSource(doc);
transformer.transform(source, result);
String xmlString = result.getWriter().toString();
System.out.println(xmlString);

note: results may vary depending on the java version, search for workarounds specific to your platform

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1  
This almost does it, but my input is a String. In this code fragment, I require a dom Node. How do I turn the source String into a dom Node? –  Steve McLeod Sep 26 '08 at 12:40
4  
new StreamSource(new StringReader(yourStringHere)) –  Chris Jester-Young Oct 20 '08 at 12:54
1  
I tried this, but the result wasn't indented (it did add some whitespace in the form of newlines). –  13ren Mar 22 '09 at 9:46
7  
This solution DIDNT WORK for me, there is a bug in java5. The follow page offers a work around but that didnt work for me either (im using jdk1.5.0_16): johnsonsolutions.blogspot.com/2007/08/… Kevin Hakanson solution below however did work. –  Sam May 15 '09 at 1:47
16  
Default indent is 0. Add transformer.setOutputProperty("{http://xml.apache.org/xslt}indent-amount", "2"); –  David Blevins Feb 18 '12 at 22:25
show 1 more comment

a simpler solution based on this answer:

public static String prettyFormat(String input, int indent) {
    try {
        Source xmlInput = new StreamSource(new StringReader(input));
        StringWriter stringWriter = new StringWriter();
        StreamResult xmlOutput = new StreamResult(stringWriter);
        TransformerFactory transformerFactory = TransformerFactory.newInstance();
        transformerFactory.setAttribute("indent-number", indent);
        Transformer transformer = transformerFactory.newTransformer(); 
        transformer.setOutputProperty(OutputKeys.INDENT, "yes");
        transformer.transform(xmlInput, xmlOutput);
        return xmlOutput.getWriter().toString();
    } catch (Exception e) {
        throw new RuntimeException(e); // simple exception handling, please review it
    }
}

public static String prettyFormat(String input) {
    return prettyFormat(input, 2);
}

testcase:

prettyFormat("<root><child>aaa</child><child/></root>");

returns:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<root>
  <child>aaa</child>
  <child/>
</root>
share|improve this answer
    
This is the code I've always used but at this company it didn't work, I assume they are using another XML transforming library. I created the factory as a separate line and then did factory.setAttribute("indent-number", 4); and now it works. –  Adrian Smith Oct 21 '10 at 13:25
    
How to make so that the output wont contain <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>? –  Thang Pham Jul 19 '11 at 19:13
3  
@Harry: transformer.setOutputProperty(OutputKeys.OMIT_XML_DECLARATION, "yes"); –  jjmontes Oct 7 '11 at 9:06
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Just to note that top rated answer requires the use of xerces.

If you don't want to add this external dependency then you can simply use the standard jdk libraries (which actually are built using xerces internally).

N.B. There was a bug with jdk version 1.5 see http://bugs.sun.com/bugdatabase/view_bug.do?bug_id=6296446 but it is resolved now.,

(Note if an error occurs this will return the original text)

package com.test;

import java.io.ByteArrayInputStream;
import java.io.ByteArrayOutputStream;

import javax.xml.transform.OutputKeys;
import javax.xml.transform.Source;
import javax.xml.transform.Transformer;
import javax.xml.transform.sax.SAXSource;
import javax.xml.transform.sax.SAXTransformerFactory;
import javax.xml.transform.stream.StreamResult;

import org.xml.sax.InputSource;

public class XmlTest {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        XmlTest t = new XmlTest();
        System.out.println(t.formatXml("<a><b><c/><d>text D</d><e value='0'/></b></a>"));
    }

    public String formatXml(String xml){
        try{
            Transformer serializer= SAXTransformerFactory.newInstance().newTransformer();
            serializer.setOutputProperty(OutputKeys.INDENT, "yes");
            //serializer.setOutputProperty(OutputKeys.OMIT_XML_DECLARATION, "yes");
            serializer.setOutputProperty("{http://xml.apache.org/xslt}indent-amount", "2");
            //serializer.setOutputProperty("{http://xml.customer.org/xslt}indent-amount", "2");
            Source xmlSource=new SAXSource(new InputSource(new ByteArrayInputStream(xml.getBytes())));
            StreamResult res =  new StreamResult(new ByteArrayOutputStream());            
            serializer.transform(xmlSource, res);
            return new String(((ByteArrayOutputStream)res.getOutputStream()).toByteArray());
        }catch(Exception e){
            //TODO log error
            return xml;
        }
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
In this case left tabs are not used. All tags begin at first symbol of the line, like usual text. –  Ruslan Dec 23 '10 at 9:57
2  
Add this line: serializer.setOutputProperty("{xml.apache.org/xslt}indent-amount", "2") –  Sam Dec 24 '10 at 5:32
    
Thanks Sam, I've added that to my example above.. –  khylo Jan 5 '11 at 13:14
    
don't you need to specify a charset when converting back and forth between bytes and string? –  Will Glass Dec 2 '11 at 1:18
    
There should be no need to convert from and to byte arrays/String. At the very least you would have to specify charset when doing so. Better option would be to use StringReader and StringWriter classes wrapped in InputSource and StreamResult. –  maximdim Dec 21 '12 at 16:00
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up vote 33 down vote accepted

Now it's 2012 and Java can do more than it used to with XML, I'd like to add an alternative to my accepted answer. This has no dependencies outside of Java 6.

import org.w3c.dom.Node;
import org.w3c.dom.bootstrap.DOMImplementationRegistry;
import org.w3c.dom.ls.DOMImplementationLS;
import org.w3c.dom.ls.LSSerializer;
import org.xml.sax.InputSource;

import javax.xml.parsers.DocumentBuilderFactory;
import java.io.StringReader;

/**
 * Pretty-prints xml, supplied as a string.
 * <p/>
 * eg.
 * <code>
 * String formattedXml = new XmlFormatter().format("<tag><nested>hello</nested></tag>");
 * </code>
 */
public class XmlFormatter {

    public String format(String xml) {

        try {
            final InputSource src = new InputSource(new StringReader(xml));
            final Node document = DocumentBuilderFactory.newInstance().newDocumentBuilder().parse(src).getDocumentElement();
            final Boolean keepDeclaration = Boolean.valueOf(xml.startsWith("<?xml"));

        //May need this: System.setProperty(DOMImplementationRegistry.PROPERTY,"com.sun.org.apache.xerces.internal.dom.DOMImplementationSourceImpl");


            final DOMImplementationRegistry registry = DOMImplementationRegistry.newInstance();
            final DOMImplementationLS impl = (DOMImplementationLS) registry.getDOMImplementation("LS");
            final LSSerializer writer = impl.createLSSerializer();

            writer.getDomConfig().setParameter("format-pretty-print", Boolean.TRUE); // Set this to true if the output needs to be beautified.
            writer.getDomConfig().setParameter("xml-declaration", keepDeclaration); // Set this to true if the declaration is needed to be outputted.

            return writer.writeToString(document);
        } catch (Exception e) {
            throw new RuntimeException(e);
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        String unformattedXml =
                "<?xml version=\"1.0\" encoding=\"UTF-8\"?><QueryMessage\n" +
                        "        xmlns=\"http://www.SDMX.org/resources/SDMXML/schemas/v2_0/message\"\n" +
                        "        xmlns:query=\"http://www.SDMX.org/resources/SDMXML/schemas/v2_0/query\">\n" +
                        "    <Query>\n" +
                        "        <query:CategorySchemeWhere>\n" +
                        "   \t\t\t\t\t         <query:AgencyID>ECB\n\n\n\n</query:AgencyID>\n" +
                        "        </query:CategorySchemeWhere>\n" +
                        "    </Query>\n\n\n\n\n" +
                        "</QueryMessage>";

        System.out.println(new XmlFormatter().format(unformattedXml));
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
No indention, but it does works with this: System.setProperty(DOMImplementationRegistry.PROPERTY,"com.sun.org.apache.xerces‌​.internal.dom.DOMImplementationSourceImpl"); –  GGB667 Mar 20 '13 at 12:21
    
How do you add indention to this example? –  GGB667 Mar 20 '13 at 12:22
    
Worked perfectly for me as-is. Using Java 6. –  Lee Meador Jun 12 '13 at 14:55
    
That's a very nice solution... –  kodmanyagha Sep 19 '13 at 14:13
    
Beautiful. Thank you, this should be a one-liner included in a standard library. –  Josh A. Jan 28 at 23:14
show 3 more comments

I've pretty printed in the past using the org.dom4j.io.OutputFormat.createPrettyPrint() method

public String prettyPrint(final String xml){  

    if (StringUtils.isBlank(xml)) {
        throw new RuntimeException("xml was null or blank in prettyPrint()");
    }

    final StringWriter sw;

    try {
        final OutputFormat format = OutputFormat.createPrettyPrint();
        final org.dom4j.Document document = DocumentHelper.parseText(xml);
        sw = new StringWriter();
        final XMLWriter writer = new XMLWriter(sw, format);
        writer.write(document);
    }
    catch (Exception e) {
        throw new RuntimeException("Error pretty printing xml:\n" + xml, e);
    }
    return sw.toString();
}
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1  
The accepted solution does not properly indent the nested tags in my case, this one does. –  Chase Seibert Nov 6 '08 at 17:37
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Here's a way of doing it using dom4j:

Imports:

import org.dom4j.Document;  
import org.dom4j.DocumentHelper;  
import org.dom4j.io.OutputFormat;  
import org.dom4j.io.XMLWriter;

Code:

String xml = "<your xml='here'/>";  
Document doc = DocumentHelper.parseText(xml);  
StringWriter sw = new StringWriter();  
OutputFormat format = OutputFormat.createPrettyPrint();  
XMLWriter xw = new XMLWriter(sw, format);  
xw.write(doc);  
String result = sw.toString();
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This didnt work for me. It just gave something like: <?xml version... on one line and everything else on another line. –  sixtyfootersdude Feb 3 '12 at 20:39
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Since you are starting with a String, you need to covert to a DOM object (e.g. Node) before you can use the Transformer. However, if you know your XML string is valid, and you don't want to incur the memory overhead of parsing a string into a DOM, then running a transform over the DOM to get a string back - you could just do some old fashioned character by character parsing. Insert a newline and spaces after every </...> characters, keep and indent counter (to determine the number of spaces) that you increment for every <...> and decrement for every </...> you see.

Disclaimer - I did a cut/paste/text edit of the functions below, so they may not compile as is.

public static final Element createDOM(String strXML) 
    throws ParserConfigurationException, SAXException, IOException {

    DocumentBuilderFactory dbf = DocumentBuilderFactory.newInstance();
    dbf.setValidating(true);
    DocumentBuilder db = dbf.newDocumentBuilder();
    InputSource sourceXML = new InputSource(new StringReader(strXML))
    Document xmlDoc = db.parse(sourceXML);
    Element e = xmlDoc.getDocumentElement();
    e.normalize();
    return e;
}

public static final void prettyPrint(Node xml, OutputStream out)
    throws TransformerConfigurationException, TransformerFactoryConfigurationError, TransformerException {
    Transformer tf = TransformerFactory.newInstance().newTransformer();
    tf.setOutputProperty(OutputKeys.OMIT_XML_DECLARATION, "yes");
    tf.setOutputProperty(OutputKeys.ENCODING, "UTF-8");
    tf.setOutputProperty(OutputKeys.INDENT, "yes");
    tf.transform(new DOMSource(xml), new StreamResult(out));
}
share|improve this answer
    
"However, if you know your XML string is valid ..." good point. See my solution based on this approach below. –  David Easley May 27 '10 at 10:51
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If using a 3rd party XML library is ok, you can get away with something significantly simpler than what the currently highest-voted answers suggest.

It was stated that both input and output should be Strings, so here's a utility method that does just that, implemented with the XOM library:

import nu.xom.*;
import java.io.*;

[...]

public static String format(String xml) throws ParsingException, IOException {
    ByteArrayOutputStream out = new ByteArrayOutputStream();
    Serializer serializer = new Serializer(out);
    serializer.setIndent(4);  // or whatever you like
    serializer.write(new Builder().build(xml, ""));
    return out.toString("UTF-8");
}

I tested that it works, and the results do not depend on your JRE version or anything like that. To see how to customise the output format to your liking, take a look at the Serializer API.

This actually came out longer than I thought - some extra lines were needed because Serializer wants an OutputStream to write to. But note that there's very little code for actual XML twiddling here.

(This answer is part of my evaluation of XOM, which was suggested as one option in my question about the best Java XML library to replace dom4j. For the record, with dom4j you could achieve this with similar ease using XMLWriter and OutputFormat. Edit: ...as demonstrated in mlo55's answer.)

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1  
Thanks, that's what I was looking for. If you have an XML already parsed with XOM in a "Document" object, you can pass it directly to serializer.write(document); –  thibaultd Aug 13 '13 at 6:07
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Hmmm... faced something like this and it is a known bug ... just add this OutputProperty ..

transformer.setOutputProperty(OutputPropertiesFactory.S_KEY_INDENT_AMOUNT, "8");

Hope this helps ...

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Using scala:

import xml._
val xml = XML.loadString("<tag><nested>hello</nested></tag>")
val formatted = new PrettyPrinter(150, 2).format(xml)
println(formatted)

You can do this in Java too, if you depend on the scala-library.jar. It looks like this:

import scala.xml.*;

public class FormatXML {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        String unformattedXml = "<tag><nested>hello</nested></tag>";
        PrettyPrinter pp = new PrettyPrinter(150, 3);
        String formatted = pp.format(XML.loadString(unformattedXml), TopScope$.MODULE$);
        System.out.println(formatted);
    }
}

The PrettyPrinter object is constructed with two ints, the first being max line length and the second being the indentation step.

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Regarding comment that "you must first build a DOM tree": No, you need not and should not do that.

Instead, create a StreamSource (new StreamSource(new StringReader(str)), and feed that to the identity transformer mentioned. That'll use SAX parser, and result will be much faster. Building an intermediate tree is pure overhead for this case. Otherwise the top-ranked answer is good.

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Just for future reference, here's a solution that worked for me (thanks to a comment that @George Hawkins posted in one of the answers):

DOMImplementationRegistry registry = DOMImplementationRegistry.newInstance();
DOMImplementationLS impl = (DOMImplementationLS) registry.getDOMImplementation("LS");
LSSerializer writer = impl.createLSSerializer();
writer.getDomConfig().setParameter("format-pretty-print", Boolean.TRUE);
LSOutput output = impl.createLSOutput();
ByteArrayOutputStream out = new ByteArrayOutputStream();
output.setByteStream(out);
writer.write(document, output);
String xmlStr = new String(out.toByteArray());
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Kevin Hakanson said: "However, if you know your XML string is valid, and you don't want to incur the memory overhead of parsing a string into a DOM, then running a transform over the DOM to get a string back - you could just do some old fashioned character by character parsing. Insert a newline and spaces after every characters, keep and indent counter (to determine the number of spaces) that you increment for every <...> and decrement for every you see."

Agreed. Such an approach is much faster and has far fewer dependencies.

Example solution:

/**
 * XML utils, including formatting.
 */
public class XmlUtils
{
  private static XmlFormatter formatter = new XmlFormatter(2, 80);

  public static String formatXml(String s)
  {
    return formatter.format(s, 0);
  }

  public static String formatXml(String s, int initialIndent)
  {
    return formatter.format(s, initialIndent);
  }

  private static class XmlFormatter
  {
    private int indentNumChars;
    private int lineLength;
    private boolean singleLine;

    public XmlFormatter(int indentNumChars, int lineLength)
    {
      this.indentNumChars = indentNumChars;
      this.lineLength = lineLength;
    }

    public synchronized String format(String s, int initialIndent)
    {
      int indent = initialIndent;
      StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
      for (int i = 0; i < s.length(); i++)
      {
        char currentChar = s.charAt(i);
        if (currentChar == '<')
        {
          char nextChar = s.charAt(i + 1);
          if (nextChar == '/')
            indent -= indentNumChars;
          if (!singleLine)   // Don't indent before closing element if we're creating opening and closing elements on a single line.
            sb.append(buildWhitespace(indent));
          if (nextChar != '?' && nextChar != '!' && nextChar != '/')
            indent += indentNumChars;
          singleLine = false;  // Reset flag.
        }
        sb.append(currentChar);
        if (currentChar == '>')
        {
          if (s.charAt(i - 1) == '/')
          {
            indent -= indentNumChars;
            sb.append("\n");
          }
          else
          {
            int nextStartElementPos = s.indexOf('<', i);
            if (nextStartElementPos > i + 1)
            {
              String textBetweenElements = s.substring(i + 1, nextStartElementPos);

              // If the space between elements is solely newlines, let them through to preserve additional newlines in source document.
              if (textBetweenElements.replaceAll("\n", "").length() == 0)
              {
                sb.append(textBetweenElements + "\n");
              }
              // Put tags and text on a single line if the text is short.
              else if (textBetweenElements.length() <= lineLength * 0.5)
              {
                sb.append(textBetweenElements);
                singleLine = true;
              }
              // For larger amounts of text, wrap lines to a maximum line length.
              else
              {
                sb.append("\n" + lineWrap(textBetweenElements, lineLength, indent, null) + "\n");
              }
              i = nextStartElementPos - 1;
            }
            else
            {
              sb.append("\n");
            }
          }
        }
      }
      return sb.toString();
    }
  }

  private static String buildWhitespace(int numChars)
  {
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    for (int i = 0; i < numChars; i++)
      sb.append(" ");
    return sb.toString();
  }

  /**
   * Wraps the supplied text to the specified line length.
   * @lineLength the maximum length of each line in the returned string (not including indent if specified).
   * @indent optional number of whitespace characters to prepend to each line before the text.
   * @linePrefix optional string to append to the indent (before the text).
   * @returns the supplied text wrapped so that no line exceeds the specified line length + indent, optionally with
   * indent and prefix applied to each line.
   */
  private static String lineWrap(String s, int lineLength, Integer indent, String linePrefix)
  {
    if (s == null)
      return null;

    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    int lineStartPos = 0;
    int lineEndPos;
    boolean firstLine = true;
    while(lineStartPos < s.length())
    {
      if (!firstLine)
        sb.append("\n");
      else
        firstLine = false;

      if (lineStartPos + lineLength > s.length())
        lineEndPos = s.length() - 1;
      else
      {
        lineEndPos = lineStartPos + lineLength - 1;
        while (lineEndPos > lineStartPos && (s.charAt(lineEndPos) != ' ' && s.charAt(lineEndPos) != '\t'))
          lineEndPos--;
      }
      sb.append(buildWhitespace(indent));
      if (linePrefix != null)
        sb.append(linePrefix);

      sb.append(s.substring(lineStartPos, lineEndPos + 1));
      lineStartPos = lineEndPos + 1;
    }
    return sb.toString();
  }

  // other utils removed for brevity
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! Only this worked for me (in a JSF environment). –  Daniel Szalay May 1 '11 at 16:11
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If you're sure that you have a valid XML, this one is simple, and avoids XML DOM trees. Maybe has some bugs, do comment if you see anything

public String prettyPrint(String xml) {
            if (xml == null || xml.trim().length() == 0) return "";

            int stack = 0;
            StringBuilder pretty = new StringBuilder();
            String[] rows = xml.trim().replaceAll(">", ">\n").replaceAll("<", "\n<").split("\n");

            for (int i = 0; i < rows.length; i++) {
                    if (rows[i] == null || rows[i].trim().length() == 0) continue;

                    String row = rows[i].trim();
                    if (row.startsWith("<?")) {
                            // xml version tag
                            pretty.append(row + "\n");
                    } else if (row.startsWith("</")) {
                            // closing tag
                            String indent = repeatString("    ", --stack);
                            pretty.append(indent + row + "\n");
                    } else if (row.startsWith("<")) {
                            // starting tag
                            String indent = repeatString("    ", stack++);
                            pretty.append(indent + row + "\n");
                    } else {
                            // tag data
                            String indent = repeatString("    ", stack);
                            pretty.append(indent + row + "\n");
                    }
            }

            return pretty.toString().trim();
    }
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Check out JTidy..

http://sourceforge.net/projects/jtidy

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1  
Don't work for XML, only for HTML. Also, the project was abandoned in 2009 :( –  Artem Feb 27 at 5:25
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I had the same problem and I'm having great success with JTidy (http://jtidy.sourceforge.net/index.html)

Example:

Tidy t = new Tidy();
t.setIndentContent(true);
Document d = t.parseDOM(
    new ByteArrayInputStream("HTML goes here", null);

OutputStream out = new ByteArrayOutputStream();
t.pprint(d, out);
String html = out.toString();
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Does jTidy work for pure XML, or is it only for (X)HTML? –  khylo Dec 17 '10 at 16:32
    
Doesn't seem to work for pure XML. Only HTMLS. –  BeepDog Jun 29 '11 at 19:38
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there is a very nice command line xml utility called xmlstarlet(http://xmlstar.sourceforge.net/) that can do a lot of things which a lot of people use.

Your could execute this program programatically using Runtime.exec and then readin the formatted output file. It has more options and better error reporting than a few lines of Java code can provide.

download xmlstarlet : http://sourceforge.net/project/showfiles.php?group_id=66612&package_id=64589

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XMLBeans can do a lot of fun things with your XML as well. :)

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I have found that in Java 1.6.0_32 the normal method to pretty print an XML string (using a Transformer with a null or identity xslt) does not behave as I would like if tags are merely separated by whitespace, as opposed to having no separating text. I tried using <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/> in my template to no avail. The simplest solution I found was to strip the space the way I wanted using a SAXSource and XML filter. Since my solution was for logging I also extended this to work with incomplete XML fragments. Note the normal method seems to work fine if you use a DOMSource but I did not want to use this because of the incompleteness and memory overhead.

public static class WhitespaceIgnoreFilter extends XMLFilterImpl
{

    @Override
    public void ignorableWhitespace(char[] arg0,
                                    int arg1,
                                    int arg2) throws SAXException
    {
        //Ignore it then...
    }

    @Override
    public void characters( char[] ch,
                            int start,
                            int length) throws SAXException
    {
        if (!new String(ch, start, length).trim().equals("")) 
               super.characters(ch, start, length); 
    }
}

public static String prettyXML(String logMsg, boolean allowBadlyFormedFragments) throws SAXException, IOException, TransformerException
    {
        TransformerFactory transFactory = TransformerFactory.newInstance();
        transFactory.setAttribute("indent-number", new Integer(2));
        Transformer transformer = transFactory.newTransformer();
        transformer.setOutputProperty(OutputKeys.INDENT, "yes");
        transformer.setOutputProperty("{http://xml.apache.org/xslt}indent-amount", "4");
        StringWriter out = new StringWriter();
        XMLReader masterParser = SAXHelper.getSAXParser(true);
        XMLFilter parser = new WhitespaceIgnoreFilter();
        parser.setParent(masterParser);

        if(allowBadlyFormedFragments)
        {
            transformer.setErrorListener(new ErrorListener()
            {
                @Override
                public void warning(TransformerException exception) throws TransformerException
                {
                }

                @Override
                public void fatalError(TransformerException exception) throws TransformerException
                {
                }

                @Override
                public void error(TransformerException exception) throws TransformerException
                {
                }
            });
        }

        try
        {
            transformer.transform(new SAXSource(parser, new InputSource(new StringReader(logMsg))), new StreamResult(out));
        }
        catch (TransformerException e)
        {
            if(e.getCause() != null && e.getCause() instanceof SAXParseException)
            {
                if(!allowBadlyFormedFragments || !"XML document structures must start and end within the same entity.".equals(e.getCause().getMessage()))
                {
                    throw e;
                }
            }
            else
            {
                throw e;
            }
        }
        out.flush();
        return out.toString();
    }
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I've run the exact same code as the accepted answer by Steve Mcloed, but i seem to be loosing some information. In my output

<query:CategorySchemeWhere> is being converted to <CategorySchemeWhere> and <query:AgencyID> is being converted to <AgencyID>

I've tried most of the answers in this thread, and they all loose this information. The Eclipse XML formatter does it, so i'm thinking i'll use the code it uses, but does anyone have a simpler way to format without loosing this information?.

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The latest answer from @Steve McLeod takes care of this problem too. Thanks Steve! –  gap_j Oct 25 '12 at 11:22
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For those searching for a quick and dirty solution - which doesn't need the XML to be 100% valid. e.g. in case of REST / SOAP logging (you never know what the others send ;-))

I found and advanced a code snipped I found online which I think is still missing here as a valid possible approach:

public static String prettyPrintXMLAsString(String xmlString) {
    /* Remove new lines */
    final String LINE_BREAK = "\n";
    xmlString.replaceAll(LINE_BREAK, "");
    StringBuffer prettyPrintXml = new StringBuffer();
    /* Group the xml tags */
    Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile("(<[^/][^>]+>)?([^<]*)(</[^>]+>)?(<[^/][^>]+/>)?");
    Matcher matcher = pattern.matcher(xmlString);
    int tabCount = 0;
    while (matcher.find()) {
        String str1 = (null == matcher.group(1) || "null".equals(matcher.group())) ? "" : matcher.group(1);
        String str2 = (null == matcher.group(2) || "null".equals(matcher.group())) ? "" : matcher.group(2);
        String str3 = (null == matcher.group(3) || "null".equals(matcher.group())) ? "" : matcher.group(3);
        String str4 = (null == matcher.group(4) || "null".equals(matcher.group())) ? "" : matcher.group(4);

        if (matcher.group() != null && !matcher.group().trim().equals("")) {
            printTabs(tabCount, prettyPrintXml);
            if (!str1.equals("") && str3.equals("")) {
                ++tabCount;
            }
            if (str1.equals("") && !str3.equals("")) {
                --tabCount;
                prettyPrintXml.deleteCharAt(prettyPrintXml.length() - 1);
            }

            prettyPrintXml.append(str1);
            prettyPrintXml.append(str2);
            prettyPrintXml.append(str3);
            if (!str4.equals("")) {
                prettyPrintXml.append(LINE_BREAK);
                printTabs(tabCount, prettyPrintXml);
                prettyPrintXml.append(str4);
            }
            prettyPrintXml.append(LINE_BREAK);
        }
    }
    return prettyPrintXml.toString();
}

private static void printTabs(int count, StringBuffer stringBuffer) {
    for (int i = 0; i < count; i++) {
        stringBuffer.append("\t");
    }
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    String x = new String(
            "<soap:Envelope xmlns:soap=\"http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/envelope/\"><soap:Body><soap:Fault><faultcode>soap:Client</faultcode><faultstring>INVALID_MESSAGE</faultstring><detail><ns3:XcbSoapFault xmlns=\"\" xmlns:ns3=\"http://www.someapp.eu/xcb/types/xcb/v1\"><CauseCode>20007</CauseCode><CauseText>INVALID_MESSAGE</CauseText><DebugInfo>Problems creating SAAJ object model</DebugInfo></ns3:XcbSoapFault></detail></soap:Fault></soap:Body></soap:Envelope>");
    System.out.println(prettyPrintXMLAsString(x));
}

here is the output:

<soap:Envelope xmlns:soap="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/envelope/">
  <soap:Body>
    <soap:Fault>
        <faultcode>soap:Client</faultcode>
        <faultstring>INVALID_MESSAGE</faultstring>
        <detail>
            <ns3:XcbSoapFault xmlns="" xmlns:ns3="http://www.someapp.eu/xcb/types/xcb/v1">
                <CauseCode>20007</CauseCode>
                <CauseText>INVALID_MESSAGE</CauseText>
                <DebugInfo>Problems creating SAAJ object model</DebugInfo>
            </ns3:XcbSoapFault>
        </detail>
    </soap:Fault>
  </soap:Body>
</soap:Envelope>
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slightly improved version from milosmns...

public static String getPrettyXml(String xml) {
    if (xml == null || xml.trim().length() == 0) return "";

    int stack = 0;
    StringBuilder pretty = new StringBuilder();
    String[] rows = xml.trim().replaceAll(">", ">\n").replaceAll("<", "\n<").split("\n");

    for (int i = 0; i < rows.length; i++) {
        if (rows[i] == null || rows[i].trim().length() == 0) continue;

        String row = rows[i].trim();
        if (row.startsWith("<?")) {
            pretty.append(row + "\n");
        } else if (row.startsWith("</")) {
            String indent = repeatString(--stack);
            pretty.append(indent + row + "\n");
        } else if (row.startsWith("<") && row.endsWith("/>") == false) {
            String indent = repeatString(stack++);
            pretty.append(indent + row + "\n");
            if (row.endsWith("]]>")) stack--;
        } else {
            String indent = repeatString(stack);
            pretty.append(indent + row + "\n");
        }
    }

    return pretty.toString().trim();
}
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