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I am trying to load an ELF file compiled with "gcc -m32 test.c -o test.exe" on Linux in a 64 bit x86 environment. I am trying to load that 32bit file (test.exe) inside a user space ELF loader which has the following core logic (32bit ELF) :=

The problem is that calling into the returned start address results in a segmentation fault core dump. Here is the code :=

void *image_load (char *elf_start, unsigned int size)
{
    Elf32_Ehdr      *hdr    = NULL;
    Elf32_Phdr      *phdr   = NULL;
    unsigned char   *start  = NULL;
    Elf32_Addr      taddr   = 0;
    Elf32_Addr      offset  = 0;
    int i = 0;
    unsigned char *exec = NULL;
    Elf32_Addr      estart = 0;

    hdr = (Elf32_Ehdr *) elf_start;

    if(!is_image_valid(hdr)) {
        printk("image_load:: invalid ELF image\n");
        return 0;
    }

    exec = (unsigned char *)mmap(NULL, size, PROT_READ | PROT_WRITE | PROT_EXEC,
                      MAP_PRIVATE | MAP_ANONYMOUS, 0, 0);

    if(!exec) {
        printk("image_load:: error allocating memory\n");
        return 0;
    }

    // Start with clean memory.
    memset(exec,0x0,size);

    phdr = (Elf32_Phdr *)(elf_start + hdr->e_phoff);

    for(i=0; i < hdr->e_phnum; ++i) {
            if(phdr[i].p_type != PT_LOAD) {
                    continue;
            }
            if(phdr[i].p_filesz > phdr[i].p_memsz) {
                    printk("image_load:: p_filesz > p_memsz\n");
                    munmap(exec, size);
                    return 0;
            }
            if(!phdr[i].p_filesz) {
                    continue;
            }

            // p_filesz can be smaller than p_memsz,
            // the difference is zeroe'd out.
            start = (unsigned char *) (elf_start + phdr[i].p_offset);
            // taddr = phdr[i].p_vaddr + (Elf32_Addr)exec;
            if(!estart) {
                estart = phdr[i].p_paddr;
            }
            taddr = (Elf32_Addr)exec + offset + (phdr[i].p_paddr - estart);
            memmove((unsigned char *)taddr,
                    (unsigned char *)start,phdr[i].p_filesz);
            offset += (phdr[i].p_memsz + (phdr[i].p_paddr - estart));

            if(!(phdr[i].p_flags & PF_W)) {
                    // Read-only.
                    mprotect((unsigned char *) taddr, 
                              phdr[i].p_memsz,
                              PROT_READ);
            }

            if(phdr[i].p_flags & PF_X) {
                    // Executable.
                    mprotect((unsigned char *) taddr, 
                            phdr[i].p_memsz,
                            PROT_EXEC);
            }
    }

    return (void *)((hdr->e_entry - estart) + (Elf32_Addr)exec);

}/* image_load */

...
    int (*main)(int, char **)=image_load(...);
    main(argc,argv); // Crash...
...

Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks

share|improve this question
    
printk suggests a kernel module, while mmap & mprotect are user-space. If you are coding a user-space application, did you consider compiling it with gcc -Wall -g and debugging it with gdb ? And the start address of an ELF image is not the main routine (but some _start in some crt0.o) –  Basile Starynkevitch Dec 17 '12 at 7:47

3 Answers 3

Please provide full runnable code, including the ELF that you are trying to load. I have taken the time to amend your code as best I could, and it seems to work, at least for this simple code.

Note that the loader must also be compiled as 32 bit code, you can not load a 32 bit file into a 64 bit process. Furthermore since you are not loading the code in the original place, it must be relocatable. Finally, it must be a static binary because you are not loading any libraries.

Update: Your code expects the entry point of the loaded code to conform to the int (*main)(int, char **) prototype which is not the case in general (side note: main actually gets a third argument, the environment, too). Read about the startup state of ELF. If you manually create the stack layout described there, you must jump to the entry point, and that will never return. In case of a C program, you could dig out the address of main and that would match the prototype. However you are then skipping the initalization of the C library (remember, your code doesn't do library loading, so the loaded program must be statically linked) and that could be a problem.

I have extended the code with the needed bits to handle a simple C program by resolving libc references and invoking main.

loader.c:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <libelf.h>
#include <sys/mman.h>
#include <dlfcn.h>

void printk(const char* msg)
{
    fputs(msg, stderr);
}

int is_image_valid(Elf32_Ehdr *hdr)
{
    return 1;
}

void *resolve(const char* sym)
{
    static void *handle = NULL;
    if (handle == NULL) {
        handle = dlopen("libc.so", RTLD_NOW);
    }
    return dlsym(handle, sym);
}

void relocate(Elf32_Shdr* shdr, const Elf32_Sym* syms, const char* strings, const char* src, char* dst)
{
    Elf32_Rel* rel = (Elf32_Rel*)(src + shdr->sh_offset);
    int j;
    for(j = 0; j < shdr->sh_size / sizeof(Elf32_Rel); j += 1) {
        const char* sym = strings + syms[ELF32_R_SYM(rel[j].r_info)].st_name;
        switch(ELF32_R_TYPE(rel[j].r_info)) {
            case R_386_JMP_SLOT:
            case R_386_GLOB_DAT:
                *(Elf32_Word*)(dst + rel[j].r_offset) = (Elf32_Word)resolve(sym);
                break;
        }
    }
}

void* find_sym(const char* name, Elf32_Shdr* shdr, const char* strings, const char* src, char* dst)
{
    Elf32_Sym* syms = (Elf32_Sym*)(src + shdr->sh_offset);
    int i;
    for(i = 0; i < shdr->sh_size / sizeof(Elf32_Sym); i += 1) {
        if (strcmp(name, strings + syms[i].st_name) == 0) {
            return dst + syms[i].st_value;
        }
    }
    return NULL;
}

void *image_load (char *elf_start, unsigned int size)
{
    Elf32_Ehdr      *hdr     = NULL;
    Elf32_Phdr      *phdr    = NULL;
    Elf32_Shdr      *shdr    = NULL;
    Elf32_Sym       *syms    = NULL;
    char            *strings = NULL;
    char            *start   = NULL;
    char            *taddr   = NULL;
    void            *entry   = NULL;
    int i = 0;
    char *exec = NULL;

    hdr = (Elf32_Ehdr *) elf_start;

    if(!is_image_valid(hdr)) {
        printk("image_load:: invalid ELF image\n");
        return 0;
    }

    exec = mmap(NULL, size, PROT_READ | PROT_WRITE | PROT_EXEC,
                      MAP_PRIVATE | MAP_ANONYMOUS, 0, 0);

    if(!exec) {
        printk("image_load:: error allocating memory\n");
        return 0;
    }

    // Start with clean memory.
    memset(exec,0x0,size);

    phdr = (Elf32_Phdr *)(elf_start + hdr->e_phoff);

    for(i=0; i < hdr->e_phnum; ++i) {
            if(phdr[i].p_type != PT_LOAD) {
                    continue;
            }
            if(phdr[i].p_filesz > phdr[i].p_memsz) {
                    printk("image_load:: p_filesz > p_memsz\n");
                    munmap(exec, size);
                    return 0;
            }
            if(!phdr[i].p_filesz) {
                    continue;
            }

            // p_filesz can be smaller than p_memsz,
            // the difference is zeroe'd out.
            start = elf_start + phdr[i].p_offset;
            taddr = phdr[i].p_vaddr + exec;
            memmove(taddr,start,phdr[i].p_filesz);

            if(!(phdr[i].p_flags & PF_W)) {
                    // Read-only.
                    mprotect((unsigned char *) taddr,
                              phdr[i].p_memsz,
                              PROT_READ);
            }

            if(phdr[i].p_flags & PF_X) {
                    // Executable.
                    mprotect((unsigned char *) taddr,
                            phdr[i].p_memsz,
                            PROT_EXEC);
            }
    }

    shdr = (Elf32_Shdr *)(elf_start + hdr->e_shoff);

    for(i=0; i < hdr->e_shnum; ++i) {
        if (shdr[i].sh_type == SHT_DYNSYM) {
            syms = (Elf32_Sym*)(elf_start + shdr[i].sh_offset);
            strings = elf_start + shdr[shdr[i].sh_link].sh_offset;
            entry = find_sym("main", shdr + i, strings, elf_start, exec);
            break;
        }
    }

    for(i=0; i < hdr->e_shnum; ++i) {
        if (shdr[i].sh_type == SHT_REL) {
            relocate(shdr + i, syms, strings, elf_start, exec);
        }
    }

   return entry;

}/* image_load */

int main(int argc, char** argv, char** envp)
{
    int (*ptr)(int, char **, char**);
    static char buf[1048576];
    FILE* elf = fopen(argv[1], "rb");
    fread(buf, sizeof buf, 1, elf);
    ptr=image_load(buf, sizeof buf);
    return ptr(argc,argv,envp);
}

elf.c:

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    fprintf(stdout, "Hello world! fprintf=%p, stdout=%p\n", fprintf, stdout);
    return 0;
}

test run:

$ gcc -m32 -g -Wall -ldl -o loader loader.c
$ gcc -m32 -pie -fPIE -o elf elf.c
$ ./loader elf
Hello world! fprintf=0xf7612420, stdout=0xf770e4c0
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your help. The problem appears to be when you try to load a C program (even a simple one that prints hello world). My guess is that either there is a problem calling the C _start routine directly, or that the loader code has a bug relocating more than one section (around where the call to memmove is made). –  Smokey Dec 18 '12 at 2:24
    
Updated the answer. –  Jester Dec 19 '12 at 0:55
    
Thanks very much for your help! It is appreciated. –  Smokey Dec 21 '12 at 15:48
    
sorry for this, but I just wanted to know where you guys get the libelf libraries. Thank you –  Bryan Kim Jul 15 '14 at 7:54
    
this is a very old thread, but, do you not need to worry about things being page aligned in your code? –  user1018513 Oct 21 '14 at 17:04

exec = (unsigned char *)mmap(NULL, size, ...

This attempts to load the executable at arbitrary address. A non-PIE executable can only be loaded at the address it was linked at (usually 0x08048000 on Linux/ix86).

The problem appears to be when you try to load a C program (even a simple one that prints hello world).

If that program was dynamically linked, it is anything but simple, and your loader has a heck of a lot more to do: loading and relocating dependent shared libraries, fixing up GOT and TLS, etc. etc.

share|improve this answer

use

exec = mmap(NULL, size, PROT_READ | PROT_WRITE | PROT_EXEC,
                  MAP_PRIVATE | MAP_ANONYMOUS, hdr, 0);

instead of

exec = mmap(NULL, size, PROT_READ | PROT_WRITE | PROT_EXEC,
                  MAP_PRIVATE | MAP_ANONYMOUS, 0, 0);
share|improve this answer
    
I have another question related to this. I am encountering a problem with similar ELF loading code where after I load the image, the C code I loaded can not access the programs string data. I was wondering if someone could point out why that might be the case. In this particular case, the program being loaded is a kernel image and is to be loaded at an address related to -Ttext 0x100000. The code is not compiled with -fPIE -pie. Thanks –  Smokey Mar 21 '13 at 11:24

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