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Given a list of intervals (shown here with their indexes):

0: 1,3
1: 0,4
2: 5,7
3: 6,9
4: 2,8

And then given an arbitrary in and out from the list indexes, is there a good way to determine the min and max value from the inclusive corresponding intervals?

For example: 0,4 would give you 0,9. 2,3 would give you 5,9.

My current solution involves iterating over every interval in range, keeping mins on the in-points and max on the out-points. Wondering if there is a data structure of algorithmic technique I am overlooking to make this faster for when the list of intervals is very long. As the list of intervals does not change, maybe there is some model I can create up front to represent the data differently?

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One easy way is to have a tree structure. The root of the tree would have the min/max value for the entire list. It would then have two children which give the min/max for the first half and last half, etc. This would allow you to have a log(n) algorithm for any sub-range. –  Vaughn Cato Dec 17 '12 at 5:14
1  
If you can afford O(n²) space, there is an obvious O(1) time algorithm: just record all minmax[i0][i1] i.e. the min and max from i0 to i1 ( it has actually n(n-1)/2 elements ). –  ring0 Dec 17 '12 at 5:40
    
I'd say the solution you should choose depends on three factors: how much memory you can take up, how much time you can spend caching the initial data structure to facilitate the algorithm, and how quickly you need the actual algorithm to run each time. Could you give more details on the problem contraints? –  Kyle Strand Dec 17 '12 at 8:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As it can be easily seen that each interval actually indicates a min and a max value.

So the problem becomes: give you 2 arrays, find the min and max value for any specified index ranges.

finding min and max value are similar, so we talk about min here.

First it can be easily done with Segment tree, just as @Vaughn Cato said.

and actually we don't need to use a so powerful data structure like Segment tree, there's another specific algorithm to solve this, which is called Range Minimum Query.

btw, i've written a post talking about RMQ, see http://attiix.com/2011/08/22/4-ways-to-solve-%c2%b11-rmq/.

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One easy way is to have a tree structure. The root of the tree would have the min/max value for the entire list. It would then have two children which give the min/max for the first half and last half, etc. This would allow you to have a O(log(n)) search algorithm, where n is the size of the entire interval list.

First you build the tree. This can be done recursively by splitting the list of intervals into two and making a tree for each sub-interval:

def makeTree(begin,end,intervals):
  if end==begin:
    return None
  if end==begin+1:
    return Node(begin,end,intervals[begin],None,None)
  partition=(begin+end)/2
  left=makeTree(begin,partition)
  right=makeTree(partition,end)
  range=combineRanges(rangeOf(left),rangeOf(right))
  return Node(begin,end,range,left,right)

Once you have the tree, you can pass the root of the tree to this function:

def findRange(node,begin,end):
  # If the node's range doesn't intersect the range you are looking for, 
  # then you don't have to look any deeper.
  if node is None or begin>=node.end or end<=node.begin:
    return None
  # If the node's range is completely inside the range you are looking for, then
  # you also don't need to look any deeper.
  if begin<=node.begin and end>=node.end:
    return node.range
  # Otherwise, check each child.
  left_range=findRange(node.left,begin,end)
  right_range=findRange(node.right,begin,end)
  # And return the combined result.
  return combineRanges(left_range,right_range)

Note that I'm using half-open intervals, such that begin <= x < end for any x in the interval. This just makes the code a bit cleaner.

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Note that since you're passing the root node to findRange(), in the worst case, the finding algorithm is still log(n) where n is the total length of the entire list, not the length of the subset. –  Kyle Strand Dec 17 '12 at 8:18
    
@KyleStrand: True, it wasn't worded well. I've fixed it. –  Vaughn Cato Dec 17 '12 at 13:13

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