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Here's demo,

public class MyClass {
    public MyClass(String str) {
        if (null == str)
            return;

        mStr = processInput(str);
        mMember1 = initMember1();
        // ... some other initialization
}

Something like above, is it good or bad?
If it returned, we may get a constructed object without correct initialization.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It depends.

If your class can behave properly with a null being passed to the constructor and bypassing initialization, then it's OK.

If your class can't, throw an exception, if not a checked exception then typically IllegalArgumentException.


It looks as though this constructor is a convenience constructor equivalent to:

MyClass o = new MyClass();
o.doSomethingWithString(str);

If so, a better approach may be to use the fluent interface pattern, where methods return this (where possible), so you can code:

MyClass o = new MyClass().doSomethingWithString(str);

Here, the method doSomethingWithString() instead of being declared as void, has a return type of MyClass and the last line would be return this;. This pattern is handy for chaining up calls to methods, ie o.doX().setY(y).doZ(); etc

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i believe someone with an exploit can still take the partial object and inject there own code during run time. –  Woot4Moo Dec 17 '12 at 17:37

This might be better.

public class MyClass {
    public MyClass(String str) {
        if (null == str){
            throw new YourException("Your message");
        }
        mStr = processInput(str);
        mMember1 = initMember1();
        // ... some other initialization
}

IMO, returning from a constructor is a bad practice. :)

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If the constructor cannot place the object in a useful state, the most bullet-proof contract possible is that the constructor throws an exception.

It is dangerous to assume that a caller will check for any internal error flag.

Deferring raising the exception only removes the point of failure recognition from the actual point of failure, making it more difficult to locate the root cause.

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When you return from the constructor it still creates the object but does not init the rest of the code after the return. If you class can behave properly, then it's ok. If it is crucial to init the rest but you can't, throw an exception for the sender to know that something has gone wrong.

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The first thing you need to do is mark that class final. Then you can proceed with handling the partial object, what you want to do is throw something like a SecurityException or an IllegalStateException. I generally lean towards the SecurityException as it indicates that there is potential for someone malicious to take that partial object and do bad things. The use of final will help to prevent someone from extending a partial object and running amok in your system.

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