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A while ago I asked this question.

My friends wanted to get the center of a circle using color differentiation. Why can't bots do the same to pass the test that is used to prevent spamming?

enter image description here

It won't be accurate all the time, but it will solve some of the tests. By measuring where the letter and background colors are, wouldn't that be enough to know the letters one by one?

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From your question: how do consistently measure (given different conditions) "where the letters and background colors are" ? If you can answer that, it would make the problem much easier and you could publish some few papers on that. I also see multiple applications that could benefit from this answer. Now, captcha systems have been broken, even Google's one (google for it). The simpler the system, the easier to break it. Google for it and you will find many systems that have been broken. –  mmgp Dec 17 '12 at 14:35
    
HAS BEEN BROKEN ????!!!!! Dose that mean that a computer program has passed a Turing test ??? to what i know , CAPTCHA systems are an application for Turing's test which is used to distinguish humans from computers ,So there should be no program can pass it , otherwise its no longer a machine. –  HSN Dec 17 '12 at 15:09
    
About how to measure "where the letters are " , i think it can be done using matlab (check the question i posted about getting the center of a circle from an image ) –  HSN Dec 17 '12 at 15:14
    
Passing a Turing test doesn't mean a machine is not a machine, it means a machine has passed a test. Your other question is very far from answering my question, very far. I'm not sure if I have to repeat, but captcha systems have been broken. Did you bother googling it yet ? Also, some captcha are so weak that you barely need any intelligence to break them, see stackoverflow.com/questions/13664161/… for an example. –  mmgp Dec 17 '12 at 16:26
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I am with you and I think it can be done with a decent success rate. However, since deformation algorithms vary on each captcha, making it harder even for human to recognize sometimes, I think it had not been done yet just for practical reasons.

If you need a different algorithm or train a different version for each site it might not worth the effort yet. Although, I believe it would happen sooner or later.

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