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I tried this code and it is not working

#!/bin/sh

#Find the Process ID for syncapp running instance

PID=`ps -ef | grep syncapp 'awk {print $2}'`

if [[ -z "$PID" ]] then
Kill -9 PID
fi

It is showing a error near awk.

Any suggestions please.

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2  
Why not just use killall syncapp ? –  Paul R Dec 17 '12 at 7:42
    
What if there is no process running? Does it give any error? –  user1597811 Dec 17 '12 at 7:44
    
See: man killall –  Paul R Dec 17 '12 at 7:45
    
This process of killing is not helping me. Can you suggest how to repair the above method. Thanks –  user1597811 Dec 17 '12 at 9:32
    
PID=ps -ef | grep syncapp 'awk {print $2}' I couldn't able to get the output which is actually process id into PID variable. Is there any syntax wrong or script wrongly written in this line of code. –  user1597811 Dec 17 '12 at 10:14

8 Answers 8

up vote 32 down vote accepted

Actually the easiest way to do that would be to pass kill arguments like below:

ps -ef | grep "your_process" | awk '{print $2}' | xargs kill

Hope it helps.

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1  
grep "your_process" | awk '{print $2}' can be simplified to just awk '/your_process/{print $2}' –  ssmith Jan 12 '14 at 2:42
    
This runs the (small) risk of killing the grep process before it kills the process you want to kill. To remedy that, use awk '/[y]our_process/{print $2}' | xargs kill, but using killall is better. –  reinierpost Mar 13 at 11:07

Try the following script:

#!/bin/bash
pgrep $1 2>&1 > /dev/null
if [ $? -eq 0 ]
then
{
    echo " "$1" PROCESS RUNNING "
    ps -ef | grep $1 | grep -v grep | awk '{print $2}'| xargs kill -9
}
else
{
    echo "  NO $1 PROCESS RUNNING"
};fi
share|improve this answer

This works good for me.

PID=`ps -eaf | grep syncapp | grep -v grep | awk '{print $2}'`
if [[ "" !=  "$PID" ]]; then
  echo "killing $PID"
  kill -9 $PID
fi
share|improve this answer
#!/bin/sh

#Find the Process ID for syncapp running instance

PID=`ps -ef | grep syncapp 'awk {print $2}'`

if [[ -z "$PID" ]] then
--->    Kill -9 PID
fi

Not sure if this helps, but 'kill' is not spelled correctly. It's capitalized.

Try 'kill' instead.

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A lot of *NIX systems also have either or both pkill(1) and killall(1) which, allows you to kill processes by name. Using them, you can avoid the whole parsing ps problem.

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That doesn't work if a process is running under java. I can't use 'killall glassfish' for exemple. I need to use killall java, but it would kill all programs running under java. –  Jonathas Pacífico Dec 2 '13 at 11:49
1  
For java processes, you can parse the value from jps and use kill the java process jps | grep "Process Name" | cut -d " " -f "1" | xargs kill -KILL –  punitjajodia Jul 11 '14 at 12:10

Came across somewhere..thought it is simple and useful

You can use the command in crontab directly ,

* * * * * ps -lf | grep "user" |  perl -ane '($h,$m,$s) = split /:/,$F
+[13]; kill 9, $F[3] if ($h > 1);'

or, we can write it as shell script ,

#!/bin/sh
# longprockill.sh
ps -lf | grep "user" |  perl -ane '($h,$m,$s) = split /:/,$F[13]; kill
+ 9, $F[3] if ($h > 1);'

And call it crontab like so,

* * * * * longprockill.sh
share|improve this answer
PID=`ps -ef | grep syncapp 'awk {print $2}'`

if [[ -z "$PID" ]] then
**Kill -9 $PID**
fi
share|improve this answer

You probably wanted to write

`ps -ef | grep syncapp | awk '{print $2}'`

but I will endorse @PaulR's answer - killall -9 syncapp is a much better alternative.

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately I didn't find the process name exactly. I'm getting the processes by using grep "sym". sym is the script name which start the process. So it is better for me to use the above method to kill the process. –  user1597811 Dec 17 '12 at 9:31
    
PID=ps -ef | grep syncapp 'awk {print $2}' I couldn't able to get the output which is actually process id into PID variable. Is there any syntax wrong or script wrongly written in this line of code. –  user1597811 Dec 17 '12 at 10:42
    
@user1597811: What you wrote is very different from what I wrote :p Check where all the quotes, and where all the pipe symbols (|) are. –  Amadan Dec 17 '12 at 23:52

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