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I have a non-gc OS X app. In this app I'm trying to assign an object to a block variable from within the block. This object is then being cleaned up from the array it's in by another thread. I'm assuming that because it's a non-gc app that the block_byref struct is setting the BLOCK_NEEDS_FREE flag, and the dispose helper function is cleaning up the object. Is a copy a safe enough fix?

- (void)assignFromArray
{
  __block NSObject iWantToKeep = nil;

  [myArray enumerateObjectsUsingBlock:^(id obj, NSUInteger idx, BOOL *stop)
  {
    if([[obj stringVar] isEqualToString:MyStringConst])
    {
       iWantToKeep = [obj copy];
       *stop = YES;
    }
  }];

/* Assume here that the array has been cleaned up by another thread
 * and all the objects in it have been released.
 *
 * Was a copy safe enough to survive the block_byref dispose
 * and the array objects being dealloc'd so that it can be accessed here?
 */
   NSLog(@"%@", [iWantToKeep stringVar]);

  //I only need it briefly, so it can be cleaned up here
  [iWantToKeep autorelease];
}
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can you log out the iWantToKeep value within your block? –  Martin Ullrich Dec 17 '12 at 8:56
    
Yes, but the actual method isn't NSLog. NSLog actually is replaced with a pretty lengthy method that passes the object pointer around, so it needs to happen outside the block. –  estobbart Dec 17 '12 at 11:44
    
you can't have a variable of type NSObject –  newacct Dec 17 '12 at 19:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Yes, that works perfectly. You just have to make sure that the copy is made before the array is discarded.

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Does the block call retain on the array before it enumerates? Or can you mutate an array during the block execution? –  estobbart Dec 17 '12 at 11:45
    
Blocks are said to "capture" the variables you use inside them. For NSObjects that means that they also get retained. At the end of the block they are released. –  Cocoanetics Dec 17 '12 at 11:55
    
Right, but what about the array can it mutate form another thread while being enumerated? –  estobbart Dec 17 '12 at 12:15
2  
mutating any array while it is being enumerated causes a runtime exception. –  Cocoanetics Dec 17 '12 at 12:27
    
Also: never assume that any NSObject is thread-safe because usually they are not because that would incur a performance-penalty. –  Cocoanetics Dec 17 '12 at 13:03

You need to release iWantToKeep before assigning a new value to it or you will be leaking.

I don't know why you are copying the object. I'm assuming you need the behavior of copying. The object just needs to be retained (copy does a retain).

Was a copy safe enough to survive the block_byref dispose

The iWantToKeep variable is still in scope at this point. So it is usable.

and the array objects being dealloc'd so that it can be accessed here?

The array does not "dealloc" its elements. It releases them. Since we retained the object we want, we own it and can use it.

Assume here that the array has been cleaned up by another thread and all the objects in it have been released.

That seems unsafe. If this happens just a little earlier, in the iteration, and the array is modified or deallocated while being iterated, bad things will happen.

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Thanks. Sounds like what I really should be doing is copying the array, then retain the object I want from within the array, and then dispose of the array copy. I don't think I'm leaking iWantToKeep, it's assign to nil at the start of the method, do I need to check if it exists?? if(iWantToKeep){[iWantToKeep realease]} ? –  estobbart Dec 18 '12 at 3:13
    
@estobbart: 1) If you are accessing data structures from multiple threads, you usually need some kind of locking (e.g. @synchronized will do) 2) when you do iWantToKeep = [obj copy];, you are leaking the previous value of iWantToKeep if it is not nil. This is true in general, not specifically to do with blocks. –  newacct Dec 18 '12 at 3:27

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