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My query:

SELECT distinct [ID], [IDGROUP], [DESCRIPTION]
FROM table

My result problem:

1, 1, Hello
1, 1, hello

How can I set a filter where I do not select duplicates where the difference is only the high/low case letter??

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3  
you can always skip the distinct and use a GROUP BY [ID], [IDGROUP], UPPER([DESCRIPTION]). Should give you the desired result i believe. –  Najzero Dec 17 '12 at 9:08
    
Are you sure its SQL Server, because distinct seems to ignore case –  Habib Dec 17 '12 at 9:11
1  
SELECT distinct [ID], [IDGROUP], [DESCRIPTION] FROM table COLLATE SQL_Latin1_General_CP1_CI_AS –  Fred Dec 17 '12 at 9:13
    
GROUP BY did not work... Yes, I´m using SQL Server 2008R2 and distinct gives these values :( –  AceAlfred Dec 17 '12 at 9:17
1  
You dont need to. You can override the settings in the query. I have posted an answer. –  Fred Dec 17 '12 at 9:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try running this query.

SELECT distinct [ID], [IDGROUP], [DESCRIPTION] COLLATE SQL_Latin1_General_CP1_CI_AS FROM table

Here you are basically saying ignore case on the DESCRIPTION column

CI = Case insensitive AS = Accent sensitive.

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OK, I had the Collate in the wrong position first time running it. This does work like a charm, thanks Fred :) –  AceAlfred Dec 17 '12 at 9:55

I guess mysql engine does not duplicate based on letter case by default. That is both Hello and hello is considered same.

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This will depend on the case sensitivity of the server set up. When the server is set up you can set the case sensitivity so one server will or could display different results to another. –  Fred Dec 17 '12 at 9:30
2  
Why have 2 people upvoted this? It doesn't remotely answer the question. It just claims that the situation in the question shouldn't happen. –  Martin Smith Dec 17 '12 at 9:50

Not sure if this is the best way but this worked for me:

SELECT distinct [ID], [IDGROUP], Upper([DESCRIPTION]) as [DESCRIPTION]
FROM table
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