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I got curious about the way power calculation is done in Java and the performance of available methods. So I wrote a simple test to check on Math.pow(), * and ^ operations.

public static void main(String[] args) {

    int SIZE = 100000000;

    int[] arr1 = new int[SIZE];
    long st1, end1, st2, end2, st3, end3;

    st1 = System.currentTimeMillis();
    for (int i = 0; i < SIZE; i++) {
        arr1[i] = (int) Math.pow(i, 4);
    }
    end1 = System.currentTimeMillis();
    System.out.println("pow: " + (end1 - st1));

    arr1 = new int[SIZE];
    st2 = System.currentTimeMillis();
    for (int i = 0; i < SIZE; i++) {
        arr1[i] = i * i * i * i;
    }
    end2 = System.currentTimeMillis();
    System.out.println("mul: " + (end2 - st2));

    arr1 = new int[SIZE];
    st3 = System.currentTimeMillis();
    for (int i = 0; i < SIZE; i++) {
        arr1[i] = i^4;
    }
    end3 = System.currentTimeMillis();
    System.out.println("  ^: " + (end3 - st3));

    //to prevent optimizations form skipping the calculations
    for (int i = 0; i < SIZE; i++) {
        if (arr1[i] == 1){
            System.out.println(1);
        }
    }
    System.out.println("done");
}

and if the first two results were quite expected:

pow: 19253 19128 19205 19145 19185 19130 19162 19177 19191 19157 | 19173
mul: 91 86 91 85 98 90 90 105 87 95 | 92
  ^: 80 85 80 70 60 65 75 60 70 60  | 71

the third one is a bit confusing. How come ^ is always a bit faster than simple multiplication and which one should be used?

All the tests were run with JRE 1.7 in similar conditions.

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closed as not a real question by EJP, C. A. McCann, Rob Kennedy, Guvante, bensiu Dec 18 '12 at 0:04

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
Because one works and the other doesn't. –  Mysticial Dec 17 '12 at 9:12
    
@Mysticial, Explain yourself, please. –  svz Dec 17 '12 at 9:13
9  
^ is not the power operator in Java or any C-like language. –  Mysticial Dec 17 '12 at 9:13
3  
Before you measure the performance of a solution, you should always make sure that they give the desired result. I don't think you did that in this case. –  Jon Skeet Dec 17 '12 at 9:15
2  
@svz - you're not the first one and won't be the last :D - it's really a false friend –  Andreas_D Dec 17 '12 at 9:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The ^ operator is not performing exponentiation - it's a bitwise "exclusive OR" (aka "xor").

Using integer math for 100000000 raised to the fourth power will give incorrect results - a 32-bit integer cannot store numbers that large.

Math.pow() will use floating point arithmetic. The answers may not be 100% accurate due to precision issues, but should be capable of representing the required range of results.

To get 100% accurate values for numbers that large, you should use the BigInteger class. However it will not be particularly fast. This is a trade off you have to make when considering accuracy vs performance.

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the ^ operator in Java is bitwise exclusive OR and definitaly not similiar to the power function.

Reference

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