Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In our UItableView search, we are using the below code to search a typed text in the cell content

NSComparisonResult result = [eachCellContent compare:searchText options:NSDiacriticInsensitiveSearch|NSCaseInsensitiveSearch range:NSMakeRange(0, [searchText length])];

This is working fine. But this is not working with korean text.

E.g: suppose one of the cell text is "소".//we are getting this combination by typing these two letters ㅅ and ㅗ If we type ㅅ only , our compare method is not working and so not listing the "소". (it is working if we type both ㅅ and ㅗ)

But the above example is working well with AddressBook application.

Is there any other compare method to support this ? (we also need this NSDiacriticInsensitiveSearch|NSCaseInsensitiveSearch )

Thanks to reading.

share|improve this question
    
Did my updated answer help? –  Martin R Dec 31 '12 at 10:55
    
Yes. Its worked when adding the argument "locale:[NSLocale currentLocale]". Thanks Martin :) –  david Jan 2 '13 at 11:31

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could try to normalize the strings using

NSString *normalizedContent = [eachCellContent decomposedStringWithCanonicalMapping];
NSString *normalizedSearch = [searchText decomposedStringWithCanonicalMapping];

and then compare these.


UPDATE: The following algorithm worked in my test project:

NSString *eachCellContent = @"소";
NSString *searchText = @"ㅅ";

NSString *normalizedContent = [eachCellContent decomposedStringWithCanonicalMapping];
NSString *normalizedSearch = [searchText decomposedStringWithCanonicalMapping];

NSComparisonResult result = [normalizedContent compare:normalizedSearch
                                               options:NSDiacriticInsensitiveSearch|NSCaseInsensitiveSearch
                                                 range:NSMakeRange(0, [normalizedSearch length])
                                                locale:[NSLocale currentLocale]];
if (result == NSOrderedSame) {
    NSLog(@"same");
}
// Output: same

In addition to decomposing the Unicode characters, the "trick" was to use a localized comparison.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks to the reply. But its not working ! NSString *normalizedContent = [eachCellContent decomposedStringWithCanonicalMapping]; NSString *normalizedSearch = [searchText decomposedStringWithCanonicalMapping]; NSComparisonResult result = [normalizedContent compare:normalizedSearch options:NSDiacriticInsensitiveSearch|NSCaseInsensitiveSearch range:NSMakeRange(0, [normalizedSearch length])]; if (result == NSOrderedSame){ //not coming here } –  david Dec 17 '12 at 11:07
    
@david: OK, it was just an idea, but I don't speak Korean, so I could not really test this. - Perhaps you can show the output of NSLog(@"%@", [eachCellContent dataUsingEncoding:NSUTF32BigEndianStringEncoding]); and NSLog(@"%@", [searchText dataUsingEncoding:NSUTF32BigEndianStringEncoding]); this might help to find the problem. –  Martin R Dec 17 '12 at 12:10
    
@david: I have updated my answer with new code, could you check that? –  Martin R Dec 17 '12 at 18:50
    
Yes, Thanks Martin :). Do you know can we achieve the same when querying from sqlite table (because we are searching from database if too much records -tableview doesn't load all records in this case-) –  david Jan 2 '13 at 11:35
    
@david: Do you use Core Data or plain sqlite? –  Martin R Jan 2 '13 at 12:10

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.