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I have the following inline function for Cython

cpdef inline int c_rate2recs_2(int maxNN,int idx):
  cdef int out=idx%maxNN
  return out

However this translates into

/* 
 *   return out
 * 
 * cpdef inline int c_rate2recs_2(int maxNN,int idx):             # <<<<<<<<<<<<<<
 *   cdef int out=idx%maxNN
 *   return out
 */

static PyObject *__pyx_pw_6kmc_cy_5c_rate2recs_2(PyObject *__pyx_self, PyObject *__pyx_args, PyObject *__pyx_kwds); /*proto*/
static CYTHON_INLINE int __pyx_f_6kmc_cy_c_rate2recs_2(int __pyx_v_maxNN, int __pyx_v_idx, CYTHON_UNUSED int __pyx_skip_dispatch) {
  int __pyx_v_out;
  int __pyx_r;
  __Pyx_TraceDeclarations
  __Pyx_RefNannyDeclarations
  __Pyx_RefNannySetupContext("c_rate2recs_2", 0);
  __Pyx_TraceCall("c_rate2recs_2", __pyx_f[0], 984);

/* 
 *   return out
 * 
 * cpdef inline int c_rate2recs_2(int maxNN,int idx):             # <<<<<<<<<<<<<<
 *   cdef int out=idx%maxNN
 *   return out
 */

static PyObject *__pyx_pf_6kmc_cy_4c_rate2recs_2(CYTHON_UNUSED PyObject *__pyx_self, int __pyx_v_maxNN, int __pyx_v_idx) {
  PyObject *__pyx_r = NULL;
  __Pyx_TraceDeclarations
  __Pyx_RefNannyDeclarations
  __Pyx_RefNannySetupContext("c_rate2recs_2", 0);
  __Pyx_TraceCall("c_rate2recs_2", __pyx_f[0], 984);
  __Pyx_XDECREF(__pyx_r);
  __pyx_t_1 = PyInt_FromLong(__pyx_f_6kmc_cy_c_rate2recs_2(__pyx_v_maxNN, __pyx_v_idx, 0)); if (unlikely(!__pyx_t_1)) {__pyx_filename = __pyx_f[0]; __pyx_lineno = 984; __pyx_clineno = __LINE__; goto __pyx_L1_error;}
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  __pyx_r = Py_None; __Pyx_INCREF(Py_None);
  goto __pyx_L0;
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  return __pyx_r;
}

As I am pretty new in the cython business, I would like to know how to get rid of most of the Python commands (cython -a flags this inline as pretty far away from pure C).

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2  
Did you try with just cdef instead of cpdef? I thought that with cpdef it will only be pure C for C functions. –  tiago Dec 17 '12 at 12:24
    
Thanks this solved my problem. However, the increase in performance in this case was negligble –  bios Dec 18 '12 at 6:37
    
for such a small function it is better not to have a function. Function calls add overhead. –  tiago Dec 18 '12 at 9:05
    
Actually the inlined function is called quite frequently and it turns out that the inlined version is much faster. Not sure why. –  bios Dec 18 '12 at 10:44
    
The inline function is faster since it's actually a function call. The code is copied on every use (that's the meaning of inline). The only downside is code size. –  sions Dec 29 '12 at 8:12

1 Answer 1

As I am pretty new in the cython business, I would like to know how to get rid of most of the python commands (cython -a flags this inline as pretty far away from pure C)

The trick is that if you can call your function nogil;

cpdef inline int c_rate2recs_2(int maxNN,int idx) nogil:
  cdef int out=idx%maxNN
  return out

then whatever yellow you see isn't actually generally going to Python. It could be an error-case, for example, or it could just be other types of mild checking. In the case of a cpdef, not only is a pure-C function made, a Python alias is made for calling from a Python scope. This will not affect speeds.

In this case some timings against a manually inlined loop showed no slowdowns, and removing inline did nothing, either, to the time. I imagine a case harder to optimise may show different characteristics, but the key is to profile.

Finally, speed-ups and removal of some of the error-checking can be had by using compiler directives.

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