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Python Infinity - Any caveats?
python unbounded xrange()

I have a question regarding Python where you code a simple script that prints a sequence of numbers from 1 to x where x is infinity. That means, "x" can be any value.

For example, if we were to print a sequence of numbers, it would print numbers from 1 to an "if " statement that says stop at number "10" and the printing process will stop.

In my current code, I'm using a "for" loop like this:

for x in range(0,100):
    print x

I'm trying to figure how can "100" in "range" be replaced with something else that will let the loop keep on printing sequences continuously without specifying a value. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks

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marked as duplicate by Hedde van der Heide, wim, Wooble, Lev Levitsky, bla Dec 18 '12 at 3:53

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
use a while loop –  Andreas Jung Dec 17 '12 at 13:02
2  
@Hedde I don't see how it's a duplicate or how the other question even helps. –  Lev Levitsky Dec 17 '12 at 13:07

4 Answers 4

up vote 12 down vote accepted

With itertools.count:

import itertools
for x in itertools.count():
    print x

With a simple while loop:

x = 0
while True:
    print x
    x += 1
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much. This worked like charm. –  Max Wayne Dec 17 '12 at 13:05
1  
@MaxWayne I'm glad it helped. You might want to accept the answer then. –  Lev Levitsky Dec 17 '12 at 14:10

y can be a number.

for x in range(0,y):
    print x

you can't have y infinitely large or negative. Following example will be useful I think.

>>> for y in range(0,):
...     print y
... 
>>> 
>>> for y in range(0,1000000000000000):
...     print y
... 
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
OverflowError: range() result has too many items
>>> for y in range(0,-1):
...     print y
... 
>>>
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I tried it, but an error appeared that said: "y is not defined" Thanks for the help –  Max Wayne Dec 17 '12 at 13:06
    
There are no limits on how big a python "integer" can become -- It'll silently convert to a long and keep going until you run out of memory. –  mgilson Dec 17 '12 at 13:07
    
@mgilson : I corrected the answer. I said python limit..that is out of memory...I don't think my answer misguide. Thanks –  Grijesh Chauhan Dec 17 '12 at 13:12
    
@MaxWayne you have to first assign a value to y. e.g. >>> y = 1000 then for loop statements. –  Grijesh Chauhan Dec 17 '12 at 13:32

You could do it with a generator:

def infinity(start=0):
    x = start
    while True:
        yield x
        x += 1

for x in infinity(1):
    print x
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x=0
while True:
  print x
  x = x +1
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1  
I believe you wanted the incrementing inside the while loop. I've put it there. I also changed While to while to make it valid syntax. –  mgilson Dec 17 '12 at 13:08
    
@mgilson yes thanks sorry typo –  Jimmy Kane Dec 17 '12 at 13:09
    
x = x +1 should be x+=1 –  Inbar Rose Dec 17 '12 at 13:09
1  
@InbarRose -- s/should/could/g :-p -- Both will work, but your suggestion is probably a bit more idiomatic. –  mgilson Dec 17 '12 at 13:10

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