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I do well master Visitor Pattern. However, I wonder something.

Most important motivation to use Visitor Pattern is to add logic involvingo specific Data Models in client side without needing to check for the real data object type. The technique used for solving is called Double-Dispatching.

So, here a code snippet of data model implementing an accept() method:

public class Ferrari extends Car {
    //......
    @Override
    public void accept(Visitor v){
      v.visit(this);
    }
  }

And here a PrintCarVisitor implementing Visitor interface:

public class PrintCarVisitor implements Visitor {
  //...
  @Override
  public void visit(Ferrari c){
    System.out.println("Ferrari");
  }
}

Hence, no if/else series and instanceof series needed.

Any client would be:

Visitor visitor = new PrintCarVisitor();
car.accept(visitor);  //no need to know the exact Car's type

However, since Visitor doesn't keep Open/Closed Principle (because a new Data Model leads to break the class by adding its own visit method), why do we bother with double-dispatching?

Can't we just isolate the if/else series WITHIN the visitor implementation.

With this hypothetical alternative, this part of code would disappear:

 public class Ferrari extends Car {
    //This method is not needed anymore with this alternative
    @Override
    public void accept(Visitor v){
      v.visit(this);
    }
  }

PrintCarVisitor would be:

public class PrintCarVisitor {
   public void visit(Car c){
     if(c instanceof Ferrari){
       System.out.println("Ferrari");
     }
   }      
}

With this alternative, every caller would still deal with data model abstraction like this:

new PrintCarVisitor().visit(car); //no need to know the exact data type in client side

A priori, this second approach is great since it doesn't involve all the boilerplate generates during implementation of pure Visitor Pattern.

I imagine this approach has two drawbacks:

1) There's no guarantee (like Visitor interface imposes) that any used visitor disposes of a method corresponding to the Car currently treated.

2) BoilerPlate code remains heavier into the Visitor implementation class with the series of instanceof and casting.

Are they any other drawbacks explaining why Visitor Pattern HAS TO use Double Dispatching and so can't simply isolate the instanceof series inside a class (as static Factory does for example)?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted
  1. If you do this, you no longer have a Visitor, you basically have some sort of processor. Your code would just be a list iteration where every time thru the loop, you pass what formerly used accept to the processor, which was formally the visitor. Instead of the visitor visiting the visited, you are in a sense inverting the paradigm; the visited becomes the visitor, since it is initially passed to the worker. You could do it; you wouldn't call it a Visitor though.

  2. Conventional wisdom usually dictates that use of instanceof should be reserved for last-resort. Why would you use instanceof, when you can let the polymorphism of Java do it for you? One of the points of having objects is this benefit. If you do this, why not eschew overriding methods and just use instanceof to determine what to do in a class's methods, instead of relying on dynamic dispatch, for the case of overriding methods?

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I like your answer. I totally agree that instanceof is not OO and so should be avoided. My question was not oriented to know Best-practice, but to strongly understand why double-dispatching IS the UNIQUE alternative for Visitor Pattern. Thanks ;) –  Mik378 Dec 17 '12 at 13:30

The Xtext project had the same problem and they created a helper class PolymorphicDispatcher. In a nutshell, PolymorphicDispatcher does at runtime what the compiler does at compile time: Find the method that matches a set of parameters best and invoke it.

So your visitor would look like:

 public class PrintCarVisitor {
   public void visit(Car c){
      System.out.println("Just a car");
   }
   public void visit(Ferrari c){
      System.out.println("A Ferrari!");
   }
 }

Here is the source.

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But the lack of compile-time checking occurs only with instanceof alternative as I described above. So, why to "secure" runtime calls involving an "unknown" Car while implementing Visitor... –  Mik378 Dec 17 '12 at 13:40
    
Because it makes the code reusable and extendable without changing code in Car or existing other visitors. Car can use PolymorphicDispatcher in it's accept() method to invoke a generic or specific method for the actual runtime type. –  Aaron Digulla Dec 17 '12 at 14:26
    
I think I get it: With this solution (working with reflection mechanism), no need to declare an accept() method within data models. Doing so would prevent compile-time type checking but thanks to reflection, runtime adds a similar type-checking feature. –  Mik378 Dec 17 '12 at 14:36
    
Yes; you could have one accept() method that would magically work for any type, even when they were added later by someone else. As long as something inherits from Car, the whole thing would "just work." –  Aaron Digulla Dec 17 '12 at 14:54
    
Isn't that mechanism? :) javaworld.com/javatips/jw-javatip98.html –  Mik378 Dec 17 '12 at 15:13

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