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So, I defined a simple generator:

def gen1(x):
    if x <= 10:
        yield x
        for v in gen1(x + 1):
            yield v

Basically, I want to decorate it so it returns all the values, but the last:

def dec(gen):

    def new_gen(x):
        g = gen(x)
        value = g.next()
        for v in g:
            yield value
            value = v

    return new_gen

Now, if I redefine gen1

@dec
def gen1(x):
    ...

for i in gen1(1):
    print i    # Nothing printed

but if I use:

some_gen = dec(gen1)

for i in some_gen(1):
    print i    # Prints 1 to 9, as needed

Why my decorator doesn't work and how can I fix it?

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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The recursive invocation of your gen1 is also subject to your decorator, so everything gets consumed by the decorator.

The simplest fix is to write the generator in non-recursive style, or to encapsulate the recursion:

Encapsulated:

@dec
def gen1(x):
    def inner(x):
        if x <= 10:
            yield x
            for v in inner(x + 1):
                yield v
    return inner(x)

Non-recursive:

@dec
def gen1(x):
    for v in range(x, 11):
        yield v
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How can I fix it? –  gg.kaspersky Dec 17 '12 at 13:36
    
@gg.kaspersky see above. –  ecatmur Dec 17 '12 at 13:40
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It doesn't work due to the interaction between the decorator and recursion. Since your generator is recursive, it relies on a certain recurrence relation. By injecting a modifying decorator between the generator and the sub-generator, you are breaking that recurrence relation.

As long as @dec drops the last element, you can't make it compatible with gen1() by changing @dec alone.

You could, however, change gen1() to make it compatible with @dec:

def dec(gen):
    def new_gen(x):
        g = gen(x)
        value = g.next()
        for v in g:
            yield value
            value = v
    return new_gen

@dec
def gen1(x):
    def gen2(x):
        if x <= 10:
            yield x
            for v in gen2(x + 1):
                yield v
    for v in gen2(x):
        yield v

for i in gen1(1):
    print i    # Prints 1 to 9, as needed

The trick here is to make gen1() non-recursive, and to delegate all the work to another, undecorated, generator. The latter can be recursive.

share|improve this answer
    
So I can't decorate recursive functions? Also, why gen1 = dec(gen1) will not work? –  gg.kaspersky Dec 17 '12 at 13:35
    
gen1 = dec(gen1) is the same as @dec def gen1(): .... It rebinds gen1 instead of creating a new name. See my updated answer regarding recursion. –  NPE Dec 17 '12 at 13:48
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