Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have built a simple Notification system in my Cake app that I want to have a function that will create a new notification when I call a certain method. Because this is not something the user would actually access directly and is only database logic I have put it in the Notification model like so:

class Notification extends AppModel
{
    public $name = 'Notification';

    public function createNotification($userId, $content, $url)
    {
        $this->create();

        $this->request->data['Notification']['user_id'] = $userId;
        $this->request->data['Notification']['content'] = $content;
        $this->request->data['Notification']['url'] = $url;

        $result = $this->save($this->request->data);

        if ($result)
        {
            $this->saveField('datetime', date('Y-m-d H:i:s'));
            $this->saveField('status', 0);
        }
    }
}

And then whenever I want to create a notification within my app I just do:

$this->Notification->createNotification($userId,'Test','Test');

However this doesn't work! The controller is talking to the model fine, but it doesn't create the row in the database... I'm not sure why... but it would seem I'm doing this wrong by just doing all the code in the model and then calling it across the app.

Edit: Based on answers and comments below, I have tried the following the code to create a protected method in my notifications controller:

protected function _createNotification($userId, $content, $url)
    {
        $this->Notification->create();

        $this->request->data['Notification']['user_id'] = $userId;
        $this->request->data['Notification']['content'] = $content;
        $this->request->data['Notification']['url'] = $url;

        $result = $this->save($this->request->data);

        if ($result)
        {
            $this->saveField('datetime', date('Y-m-d H:i:s'));
            $this->saveField('status', 0);
        }
    }

Now the thing that is stumping me still (apologies if this is quite simple to others, but I have not used protected methods in CakePHP before) is how do I then call this from another controller? So for example If have a method in my PostsController and want to create a notification on successful save, how would I do this?

I thought about in my PostsController add method:

if($this->save($this->request-data){

    $this->Notification->_createNotification($userId,'Test','Test');

}

But being protected I wouldn't be able to access the method from outside of the NotificationsController. Also I'm using the same syntax as if I was calling a function from a model so again it doesn't feel right.

Hopefully someone can help me out and get me back on track as this is a new area to me.

share|improve this question
4  
its nice that you deleted the question just to resubmit it 10 minutes later without all the comments which you deserved for your pour research on the topic. and I did not even downvote your question for that - just to be clear. –  mark Dec 17 '12 at 13:43
    
@mark The comments were condescending and not helpful. Not everyone knows CakePHP like you may do and people asking for help and advice should not feel like they're being bullied and patronised when they ask a question that others feel is simple in their minds but may not be obvious to the asker. Remember people ask questions because they don't understand something, so it's fairly obvious to assume that they don't see the code and principles the way you would do. –  Cameron Dec 17 '12 at 16:11
    
I could only repeat what deceze commented below. after two years you should not have to ask those question you did for the last few months. Why always tried to help you and get you going when you were stuck. But most of us just feel very disappointed and tired if there is absolutely no improvement to be seen here. And I still did not downvote anything here - the voting of others seem to reflect what deceze and I are feeling. So we do not stand alone with the opinion. –  mark Dec 17 '12 at 16:35
    
That's quite shocking if people are being judged like that on Stack Overflow! People shouldn't be afraid to ask questions for feeling like an idiot because the community has decided that they are above that stage. I am very capable in some areas and not so much in others that I may not of done before, and if people don't want to offer advice, then they should move on to another question rather than patronise and judge people like what has happened. I could care-less for downvoting, but comments like what I have seen are not encouraging to people seeking advice. –  Cameron Dec 17 '12 at 16:42
    
you still got your answer, didnt you? its your fault if you don't use them to your advantage... –  mark Dec 17 '12 at 16:48

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Methods in a model are not "publicly accessible" by definition. A user cannot call or invoke a method in a model. A user can only cause a controller action to be initiated, never anything in the model. If you don't call your model method from any controller, it's never going to be invoked. So forget about the "non-public" part of the question.

Your problem is that you're working in the model as if you were in a controller. There is no request object in a model. You just pass a data array into the model method and save that array. No need for $this->request. Just make a regular array(), put the data that was passed by the controller in there and save it.

share|improve this answer
    
How do I call the controller method though? As by protecting it with the underscore it's no longer accessible to other controllers... or is it? I've temporally moved the logic to JUST the controller to test creating notifications by calling the action if that makes sense. –  Cameron Dec 17 '12 at 15:42
    
Don't put it in the controller. Put it in the model. Call the model method from the controller. –  deceze Dec 17 '12 at 15:48
    
That's what I had originally. But when I called the method from another controller it didn't do anything. –  Cameron Dec 17 '12 at 15:52
    
Then you didn't call it correctly. If the method is core business logic and needs to be used by several controllers, put it in a model. –  deceze Dec 17 '12 at 15:53
    
I called it like above... But I don't think that's the problem. What should the code in my model method be then. If I'm creating a new row in the table but without using the request->data. –  Cameron Dec 17 '12 at 16:33

the controller should pass all data to the model

$this->createNotification($this->request->data);

the model then can use the data:

public function createNotification(array $data) {
    $key = $data[$this->alias]['key'];
    $data[...] = ...;

    $this->create();
    return $this->save($data);
}

you never ever try to access the controller (and/or its request object) from within a model.

you can also invoke the method from other models, of course:

public function otherModelsMethod() {
    $this->Notification = ClassRegistry::init('Notification');

    $data = array(
         'Notification' => array(...)
    );
    $this->Notification->createNotification($data);
}

and you can make your methods verbose, but that usually makes it harder to read/understand/maintain with more and more arguments:

public function createNotification($userId, $content, $url) {
    $data = array();
    // assign the vars to $data
    $data['user_id'] = $userId;
    ...

    $this->create();
    return $this->save($data);
}

so this is often not the cake way..

share|improve this answer
    
So how do I make the method non-public accessible and also call the method from another controller... –  Cameron Dec 17 '12 at 13:46
2  
$this->loadModel('Notification'); $this->Notification->createNotification() always works anywhere in your controllers. And you simply don't make it non-public accessible. By NOT putting it in your controller code you already achieve that out of the box –  mark Dec 17 '12 at 13:49
1  
I cant follow you. But its nice you downvoted the solution to your non-existent problem :) –  mark Dec 17 '12 at 13:53
1  
@cameron: there never was a problem. only in your world. do it as you are told and you will be fine –  mark Dec 17 '12 at 14:00
1  
@Cameron I'm sorry if I was condescending, but I remember answering your Cake questions over two years ago and it seems unfathomable to me that you would be asking this kind of question after working with Cake for this long. And whether by trade or not, I'd say you're a PHP programmer now, after having done it for so long. Keep on, but you need to get to the next level with your programming skills sometime, continuing these questions isn't a good sign. –  deceze Dec 17 '12 at 14:40

The whole approach is totally wrong in the MVC context IMO and screams for the use of the CakePHP event system. Because what you want is in fact trigger some kind of event. Read http://book.cakephp.org/2.0/en/core-libraries/events.html

Trigger an Event and attach a global event listener that will listen for this kind of events and execute whatever it should do (save something to db) when an event happens. It's clean, flexible and extendible.

If you did a proper MVC stack for your app most, if not all, events aka notifications should be fired from within a model like when a post was saved successfully for example.

share|improve this answer

This is what I have ended up doing. While it certainly isn't glamorous. It works for what I want it to do and is a nice quick win as the notifications are only used in a few methods so I'm not creating a large amount of code that needs improving in the future.

First to create a notification I do the following:

$notificationContent = '<strong>'.$user['User']['username'].'</strong> has requested to be friends with you.';
$notificationUrl = Router::url(array('controller'=>'friends','action'=>'requests'));
$this->Notification->createNotification($friendId,$notificationContent,$notificationUrl);

Here I pass the content I want and the URL where the user can do something, in this case see the friend request they have been notified about. The url can be null if it's an information only notification.

The createNotification function is in the model only and looks like:

public function createNotification($userId, $content, $url = null)
{
    $this->saveField('user_id',$userId);
    $this->saveField('content',$content);
    $this->saveField('url',$url);
    $this->saveField('datetime', date('Y-m-d H:i:s'));
    $this->saveField('status', 0);
}

This creates a new record in the table with the passed content, sets its status to 0 (which means unread) and the date it was created. The notification is then set as read when a user visits the notifications page.

Again this is most probably not an ideal solution to the problem outlined in this question... but it works and is easy to work with And may prove useful to others who are learning CakePHP who want to run functions from models when building prototype apps.

Remember nothing to stop you improving things in the future!

share|improve this answer
    
You are aware that you trigger 5x a save() by using saveField? api.cakephp.org/view_source/model#line-1573 Use save() directly instead saveField() 5 times. I'm not sure but depending on the underlying driver this will very likely cause 5 queries instead one. –  burzum Dec 18 '12 at 0:02
    
How could I improve the save then? Thanks –  Cameron Dec 18 '12 at 0:12

First of all, you can improve your last solution to do one save() (instead of 5) the following way:

public function createNotification($userId, $content, $url = null){

    $data = array(
        'user_id' => $userId,
        'content' => $content,
        'url' => $url,
        'datetime' => date('Y-m-d H:i:s'),
        'status' => 0
    );

    $this->create();
    $this->save($data);
}

When I began programming CakePHP(1.3) more than a year ago I also had this problem. (I wanted to use a function of a controller in any other controller.) Because I didn't know/researched where to place code like this I've done it wrong for over a year in a very big project. Because the project is really really big I decided to leave it that way. This is what i do:

I add a function (without a view, underscored) to the app_controller.php:

class AppController extends Controller {
    //........begin of controller..... skipped here

    function _doSomething(){
        //don't forget to load the used model
        $this->loadModel('Notification');
        //do ur magic (save or delete or find ;) )
        $tadaaa = $this->Notification->find('first');
        //return something
        return $tadaaa;
    }
}

This way you can access the function from your Notification controller and your Posts controller with:

$this->_doSomething();

I use this kind of functions to do things that have nothing to do with data submittance or reading, so i decided to keep them in the app_controller. In my project these functions are used to submit e-mails to users for example.. or post user actions to facebook from different controllers.

Hope I could make someone happy with this ;) but if you're planning to make a lot of these functions, it would be much better to place them in the model!

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.