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I have a class Rectangle which has a method RandomPoint returning a random point within it. It looks like:

class Rectangle {
    int W,H;
    Random rnd = new Random();

    public Point RandomPoint() {
        return new Point(rnd.NextDouble() * W, rnd.NextDouble() * H);
    }
}

But I hope it to be a IEnumerable<Point> so that I can use LINQ on it, e.g. rect.RandomPoint().Take(10).

How to implement it succinctly?

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So, you want to get a set of random points within the rectangle? –  Oded Dec 17 '12 at 14:08
    
Is Point a custom type or a one from the framework or a library? –  Mark Byers Dec 17 '12 at 14:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You can use an iterator block:

class Rectangle
{
    public int Width { get; private set; }
    public int Height { get; private set; }

    public Rectangle(int width, int height)
    {
        this.Width = width;
        this.Height = height;
    }

    public IEnumerable<Point> RandomPoints(Random rnd)
    {
        while (true)
        {
            yield return new Point(rnd.NextDouble() * Width,
                                   rnd.NextDouble() * Height);
        }
    }
}
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until today I didn't realize what yield does. BTW, why do you suggest Rectangle to receive a Random as parameter, rather than maintaining in itself? –  Lai Yu-Hsuan Dec 18 '12 at 6:09
    
@LaiYu-Hsuan: Because in your code if you create multiple rectangles in a loop they will all generate the same sequence of points. –  Mark Byers Dec 18 '12 at 8:19
    
but don't they still generate the same sequence, if I use while(true) { var rnd = new Random(); var rect = new Rectangle(); }? –  Lai Yu-Hsuan Dec 18 '12 at 18:31
    
@LaiYu-Hsuan: Yes. That's why you should not create the random object inside the loop. You should create a single random object outside the loop and reuse that same object for all your rectangles. –  Mark Byers Dec 18 '12 at 22:45
IEnumerable<Point> RandomPoint(int W, int H)
{
    Random rnd = new Random();
    while (true)
        yield return new Point(rnd.Next(0,W+1),rnd.Next(0,H+1));
}
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1  
Good catch, using Random.Next(int, int) instead of Random.NextDouble() –  hvd Dec 17 '12 at 14:11
    
Using Random.Next(int, int) can be useful in some situations but note that this code will only generate points that have integral coordinates. The OPs original code will generate any point inside the rectangle, not just points that are integer values. So this might not be what the OP wants. –  Mark Byers Dec 18 '12 at 22:49

yield could be an option;

public IEnumerable<Point> RandomPoint() {
    while (true)
    {
        yield return new Point(rnd.NextDouble() * W, rnd.NextDouble() * H);
    }
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