Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am a beginner at RESTful services.

I need to create an interface where the client needs to pass up to 9 parameters.

I would prefer to pass the parameters as a JSON object.

For instance if my JSON is:

'{
    "age":100,
    "name":"foo",
    "messages":["msg 1","msg 2","msg 3"],
    "favoriteColor" : "blue",
    "petName" : "Godzilla",
    "IQ" : "QuiteLow"
}'

And if I need to execute a server side method below in the end:

public Person FindPerson(Peron lookUpPerson)
{
Person found = null;
// Implementation that finds the Person and sets 'found'
return found;
}

Question(s):
How should I make the call from the client-side with the above JSON string? And how can I create a signature and implementation of the RESTful service method that

  • accepts this JSON,
  • parses and deserializes it into Person object and
  • calls / returns the FindPerson method's return value back to client?
share|improve this question
    
See stackoverflow.com/questions/13165533/… –  L.B Dec 17 '12 at 14:20
    
Which language are you using to call the service? JavaScript, C#, something else? –  carlosfigueira Dec 17 '12 at 21:12

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you want to create a WCF operation to receive that JSON input, you'll need to define a data contract which maps to that input. There are a few tools which do that automatically, including one which I wrote a while back at http://jsontodatacontract.azurewebsites.net/ (more details on how this tool was written at this blog post). The tool generated this class, which you can use:

// Type created for JSON at <<root>>
[System.Runtime.Serialization.DataContractAttribute()]
public partial class Person
{

    [System.Runtime.Serialization.DataMemberAttribute()]
    public int age;

    [System.Runtime.Serialization.DataMemberAttribute()]
    public string name;

    [System.Runtime.Serialization.DataMemberAttribute()]
    public string[] messages;

    [System.Runtime.Serialization.DataMemberAttribute()]
    public string favoriteColor;

    [System.Runtime.Serialization.DataMemberAttribute()]
    public string petName;

    [System.Runtime.Serialization.DataMemberAttribute()]
    public string IQ;
}

Next, you need to define an operation contract to receive that. Since the JSON needs to go in the body of the request, the most natural HTTP method to use is POST, so you can define the operation as below: the method being "POST" and the style being "Bare" (which means that your JSON maps directly to the parameter). Notice that you can even omit the Method and BodyStyle properties, since "POST" and WebMessageBodyStyle.Bare are their default values, respectively).

[WebInvoke(Method = "POST", BodyStyle = WebMessageBodyStyle.Bare)]
public Person FindPerson(Peron lookUpPerson)
{
    Person found = null;
    // Implementation that finds the Person and sets 'found'
    return found;
}

Now, at the method you have the input mapped to lookupPerson. How you will implement the logic of your method is up to you.

Update after comment

One example of calling the service using JavaScript (via jQuery) can be found below.

var input = '{
    "age":100,
    "name":"foo",
    "messages":["msg 1","msg 2","msg 3"],
    "favoriteColor" : "blue",
    "petName" : "Godzilla",
    "IQ" : "QuiteLow"
}';
var endpointAddress = "http://your.server.com/app/service.svc";
var url = endpointAddress + "/FindPerson";
$.ajax({
    type: 'POST',
    url: url,
    contentType: 'application/json',
    data: input,
    success: function(result) {
        alert(JSON.stringify(result));
    }
});
share|improve this answer
    
Very useful answer carlosfigueira! (Can you also add the Javascript call so that it can cover all parts roughly) Thanks! –  pencilCake Dec 18 '12 at 6:41
    
I have asked how to replace this jquery ajax call with a JavaScript builtin functions usage only :) (See my last question, if interested :) ) –  pencilCake Dec 18 '12 at 13:29
    
The sample at msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/vstudio/… shows one way of doing that, using the XMLHttpRequest object. –  carlosfigueira Dec 18 '12 at 16:25

1-Add the WebGet attribute

<OperationContract()> _
        <WebGet(UriTemplate:="YourFunc?inpt={inpt}", BodyStyle:=WebMessageBodyStyle.Wrapped,
                RequestFormat:=WebMessageFormat.Json, ResponseFormat:=WebMessageFormat.Xml)> _
        Public Function YourFunch(inpt As String) As String

2-Use NewtonSoft to serialize/deserialize your json into your object (note the above just takes in String), NewtonSoft is much faster than the MS serializer.

use NewtonSoft for serialization http://json.codeplex.com/

3- your .svc file will contain Factory="System.ServiceModel.Activation.WebServiceHostFactory

4- your web.config will contain

     <behaviors>
      <endpointBehaviors>
        <behavior name="webHttpBehavior">
          <webHttp />
        </behavior>
      </endpointBehaviors>
    </behaviors>

...and...

  <system.webServer>
    <modules runAllManagedModulesForAllRequests="true"/>
  </system.webServer>
share|improve this answer
    
If you want to pass a JSON input to a WCF service, you shouldn't use [WebGet] - the input should be passed in the request body, so GET shouldn't be used for that. It should use [WebInvoke] instead. –  carlosfigueira Dec 17 '12 at 21:11

check this question and answer plz: http://forums.asp.net/t/1672365.aspx/1

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.