Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to figure out what does the empty {} mean.

var $sb = $sb || {};

Does this mean that varaible $sb's value is either copied to itself or it is a function literal?

full context:

var $sb = $sb || {};
$sb.xxx = function() {
    // code
}
share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

var a = {} is called the object literal notation. It's a faster than var a = new Object() because it needs no scope resolution (ie you could have defined a constructor with the same name and therefor the JavaScript engine must do such a lookup).

The pattern var a = a || {}; is used to avoid replacing a in case you have already defined a. In this pattern, the or-operator: || functions as a coalescing operator. If a is null or undefined it will execute the expression at the right-hand of the statement: {}

Using this pattern ensures you that a will always be defined as an object and, in case it already exist, will not be overwritten.

share|improve this answer

It's short for:

new Object()

In this case, this means $sb will be set to it's own value, or to a new, empy object in case $sb is undefined.

share|improve this answer

It's an object literal. Like:

var obj = { x: 4, y: 2 };

only there are no properties:

var obj = {};

The || operator returns the first operand if it evaluates to a non-falsy value, otherwise it returns the second operand. So the expression $sb || {}; returns the value of $sb if it exists, otherwise it creates a new empty object.

share|improve this answer

It's shortcut for

new Object()

So this line

var $sb = $sb || {};

Will check if variable $sb exists and if not create new object and assign it to $sb variable.

So in other way you can write this like:

if( !$sb ) {
    var $sb = new Object();
}
share|improve this answer

It is the abbreviation for new Object()

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.