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Given this hash:

h = { "01"=>0, "02"=>0, "03"=>5, "04"=>6, "05"=>0, "06"=>0, "07"=>0, "08"=>7, "09"=>8, "10"=>0, "11"=>0, "12"=>0 }

how do I trim it to get this result:

h = { "03"=>5, "04"=>6, "05"=>0, "06"=>0, "07"=>0, "08"=>7, "09"=>8 }

that is, I want to remove the zero values from the beginning and the end of the hash.

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As far as I know, the keys of the hashes in Ruby are not ordered, so you need to specify which order of keys (and/or values) you want. You can use a sort routine for that. –  Shlomi Fish Dec 17 '12 at 15:39
1  
Since Ruby 1.9, hashes are ordered ... meaning they remember the order in which keys have been added. Still, if you want to store data and need to do sorting etc ... an Array is more appropriate –  Anthony Alberto Dec 17 '12 at 15:41
    
If you need to store data and access it quickly, an array is not appropriate. Sorting a hash isn't difficult but it is more so than an array, however, how the data contained is being used/accessed is what I use to decide between an array or a hash. –  the Tin Man Dec 17 '12 at 18:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use break to stop the execution.

h.delete_if{|k,v| v == 0 ? true : break }
h.reverse_each{|k,v| v == 0 ? h.delete(k) : break }
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Doesn't remove any from the end. –  MrDanA Dec 17 '12 at 15:29
    
h.reverse_each{|k,v| v == 0 ? h.delete(k) : break } –  siddick Dec 17 '12 at 15:31

Improved CubaLibre's answer:

Hash[h.drop_while { |k,v| v == 0 }.reverse.drop_while { |k,v| v == 0 }.reverse]
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Hash[h.drop_while {|k,v| v == 0 }.take_while {|k,v| v != 0}]

This version makes assumptions about the ordering of keys in the Hash which is not a good idea.

Perhaps a combination of select and reject will read better.

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I'd +1 it for being functional, but the tail-trimming isn't right. –  tokland Dec 17 '12 at 15:45
    
I was in the middle of editing it when my computer ran out of juice! Never mind. Thanks for the +1 –  CubaLibre Dec 17 '12 at 17:42
    
But I wasn't referring to "0"/0, the problem is if you have zeros in the middle of the hash, i.e. Try with {a: 0, b: 1, c: 0, d: 2, e: 0}. –  tokland Dec 17 '12 at 18:44
    
True that. I guess that makes reverse a necessity. –  CubaLibre Dec 19 '12 at 5:39

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