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I am trying to extract date, month and year from the below string.

my $test_str = "Jan 01, 2004    Feb 01, 2004    Mar 01, 2004    Apr 01, 2004    May 01, 2004";
foreach $s (split('\t', $test_str)) {
   my ($m, $d, $y) = split('[\s|,\s]');
   print ("$m=$d=$y\n");
}

when I print the output, $y is alway empty. Am I doing something wrong? the regx I have is

[\s|,\s] # match a space or space and a comma
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5 Answers 5

Your split regex [\s|,\s] is a character class (denoted by the [] brackets), which means: "split on a single character that is either a whitespace, a pipe |, a comma, or a whitespace (again)". You will split the string Jan 01, 2004 into four strings:

"Jan"
"01"
""        # comma + whitespace creates empty string
"2004"

You also split on the $_ variable, but I assume that is a typo.

To fix your problem, change that line to:

my ($m, $d, $y) = split(/[\s,]+/, $s);

As you can see, the use of the + quantifier will strip multiple consecutive commas or whitespace.

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You can also do it like this: split /,?\s/, $s;.

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Use strict and warnings and you'll find that $s causes compilation errors.

Then

my ($m, $d, $y) = split('\s|,\s', $s );

I just got rid of the [] brackets and it worked fine.

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Try:

my $test_str = "Jan 01, 2004    Feb 01, 2004    Mar 01, 2004    Apr 01, 2004    May 01, 2004";
foreach my $s (split(/\t/, $test_str)) {
   my ($m, $d, $y) = split(/\s|,\s/,$s);
   print ("$m=$d=$y\n");
}

This gives the output that you want:

Jan=01=2004
Feb=01=2004
Mar=01=2004
Apr=01=2004
May=01=2004

As mentioned by the other folks who answered, [\s|,\s] is a character class matching exactly one of \s, |, or , (which is obviously not what you want).

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Rather than using split, it is simpler in this case just to find all alphanumeric substrings in the target string. The \w pattern matches alphanumerics plus the underscore character, and is sufficiently accurate for this purpose.

use strict;
use warnings;

my $test_str = "Jan 01, 2004\tFeb 01, 2004\tMar 01, 2004\tApr 01, 2004\tMay 01, 2004";

foreach (split /\t/, $test_str) {
   my ($m, $d, $y) = /\w+/g;
   print "$m=$d=$y\n";
}

output

Jan=01=2004
Feb=01=2004
Mar=01=2004
Apr=01=2004
May=01=2004
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