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I have only just started to learn to program following http://learnpythonthehardway.org. After learning about loops and if-statements I wanted to try to make a simple guessing game.

The problem is:

If you make an incorrect guess it gets stuck and just keeps repeating either "TOO HIGH" or "TOO LOW" until you hit crtl C.

I have read about while loops and have read other peoples code but I simply dont want to just copy the code.

print ''' This is the guessing game! 
A random number will be selected from 1 to 10.
It is your objective to guess the number!'''

import random

random_number = random.randrange(1, 10)
guess = input("What could it be? > ")
correct = False

while not correct:
    if guess == random_number:
        print "CONGRATS YOU GOT IT"
        correct = True
    elif guess > random_number:
        print "TOO HIGH"
    elif guess < random_number:
        print "TOO LOW"
    else:
        print "Try something else"
share|improve this question
    
Is LPTHW really teaching people to use input() in Python 2? –  Wooble Dec 17 '12 at 15:55
    
You need to prompt the user again in the while not correct: loop; Eumiro's method is best :). In addition, I think random.randrange(1, 10) will get a random range from 1 - 9, as the last number MAY be exclusive. I'm not sure if it is; in just the normal object type, range(1, 10) is only 1 to 9; it excludes the second argument. –  Rushy Panchal Dec 17 '12 at 16:01
    
@F3AR3DLEGEND is correct: random.randrange(start, stop[, step]) returns a random number between start <= number < stop –  furins Dec 17 '12 at 16:18
    
Ah ok, I wasn't sure if the stop argument was exclusive or not (as in a normal range, the stop argument IS exclusive). –  Rushy Panchal Dec 17 '12 at 16:32
    
@ wooble No LPTHW doesn't, I just wanted to see if I could do this with what I had learned so far. –  Cowan Roberts Dec 17 '12 at 18:26

2 Answers 2

You have to ask the user again.

Add this line at the end (indented by four spaces to keep it within the while block):

    guess = input("What could it be? > ")

This is just a quick hack. I would otherwise follow the improvement proposed by @furins.

share|improve this answer

Moving the request inside the while loop does the trick :)

print ''' This is the guessing game! 
A random number will be selected from 1 to 10.
It is your objective to guess the number!'''

import random

random_number = random.randrange(1, 10)
correct = False

while not correct:
    guess = input("What could it be? > ")  # ask as long as answer is not correct
    if guess == random_number:
        print "CONGRATS YOU GOT IT"
        correct = True
    elif guess > random_number:
        print "TO HIGH"
    elif guess < random_number:
        print "TO LOW"
    else:
        print "Try something else"
share|improve this answer
    
ops, it's almost the same answer of @eumiro... however putting the question at the beginning of the while loop allow you to not repeat yourself. Sorry for the duplicate –  furins Dec 17 '12 at 15:43
    
and it's a better answer. –  eumiro Dec 17 '12 at 15:57

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