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I'm not a pythonista, so I'm not sure if this is really obvious or not. I have a python module installed on my system and I'd like to be able to see what functions/classes/methods are available in it so I can call the doc function on each one. In ruby I can do something like ClassName.methods to get a list of all the methods available on that class. Is there something similar in python?

eg. something like:

from somemodule import foo
print foo.methods # or whatever is the correct method to call
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9 Answers 9

up vote 35 down vote accepted

The inspect module. Also see the pydoc module, the help() function in the interactive interpreter and the pydoc command-line tool which generates the documentation you are after. You can just give them the class you wish to see the documentation of. They can also generate, for instance, HTML output and write it to disk.

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You can use dir(module) to see all available methods/attributes. Also check out PyDocs.

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4  
This isn’t strictly true. The dir() function “attempts to produce the most relevant, rather than complete, information”. Source: docs.python.org/library/functions.html#dir . –  Zearin Apr 17 '12 at 14:08
    
and the module name should be quoted. –  jAckOdE Mar 24 at 3:10
    
@jAckOdE Quoted? Then you'll get available methods and attributes of the string module. –  OrangeTux May 6 at 7:44
    
@OrangeTux: oops, that supposed to be a question. yeap, you answered it. –  jAckOdE May 8 at 7:34

Once you've imported the module, you can just do:

 help(modulename)

... To get the docs on all the functions at once, interactively. Or you can use:

 dir(modulename)

... To simply list the names of all the functions and variables defined in the module.

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import types
import yourmodule

print [yourmodule.__dict__.get(a) for a in dir(yourmodule)
  if isinstance(yourmodule.__dict__.get(a), types.FunctionType)]
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5  
For this route, use getattr(yourmodule, a, None) instead of yourmodule.__dict__.get(a) –  Thomas Wouters Sep 26 '08 at 12:53
    
Only shows functions, not classes, etc. –  Hannes Ovrén Sep 26 '08 at 15:16
2  
your_module.__dict__ is my choice because you actually get a dict containing functionName:<function> and you now have the ability to CALL that function dynamically. good times! –  jsh Jan 28 '11 at 21:31

An example with inspect:

from inspect import getmembers, isfunction
from my_project import my_module

functions_list = [o for o in getmembers(my_module) if isfunction(o[1])]

getmembers returns a list of (object_name, object_type) tuples.

You can replace isfunction with any of the other isXXX functions in the inspect module.

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9  
getmembers can take a predicate, so your example could also be written: functions_list = [o for o in getmembers(my_module, isfunction)] –  Christopher Currie Dec 4 '12 at 23:01
1  
@ChristopherCurrie, you could also avoid the useless list comprehension with functions_list = getmembers(my_module, predicate) because it already returns a list ;) –  Nil Feb 19 at 21:43

This will do the trick:

dir(module) 

However, if you find it annoying to read the returned list, just use the following loop to get one name per line.

for i in dir(module): print i
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your one name per line suggestion is very useful –  Ram Narasimhan May 1 '12 at 22:38

dir(module) is the standard way when using a script or the standard interpreter, as mentioned in most answers.

However with an interactive python shell like IPython you can use tab-completion to get an overview of all objects defined in the module. This is much more convenient, than using a script and print to see what is defined in the module.

  • module.<tab> will show you all objects defined in the module (functions, classes and so on)
  • module.ClassX.<tab> will show you the methods and attributes of a class
  • module.function_xy? or module.ClassX.method_xy? will show you the docstring of that function / method
  • module.function_x?? or module.SomeClass.method_xy?? will show you the source code of the function / method.
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It is not (or at least no longer) proper to use dir(module). The code should read like this:

dir('module') or dir('modules') 

Or you specify the module you want like this: dir('sys') to produce results from the module name sys. dir() returns errors while dir('') is what you need. *help('') will return help information if available for most functions. eg; help('modules') will return module help info.

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or you specify the module you want like this: dir('sys') to produce results from the module name sys. dir() returns errors while dir('') is what you need. *help('') will return help information if available for most functions. eg; help('modules') will return module help info. –  Dan Evans Jun 23 '12 at 21:41
2  
dir('module') returns the methods for string function, which is totally different from what you expect. I believe this is same even for python 3. –  Ehsan Foroughi Oct 1 '12 at 18:54

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