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I have an MVC3 app which is using POCO classes separated into distinct layers. I have implemented a generic repo pattern as well.

I have a dashboard which uses Kendo UI charts for management to view real time stats. As the database is growing the dashboard is slower and slower. I found these reasons:

  1. Records grow daily
  2. Each chart calls to the repo to get all the rows to calculate stats with LINQ
  3. Automapper is creating my model to viewmodels

I would like to speed this up by using stored procedures in the database to get exactly the numbers I need for stats. I am not sure how I should implement this... even though it feels so wrong! Any tips?

Example Controller with Repo code

Public Class DashboardController
    Inherits BaseController

    Private ticketRepo As MaintenanceTicketsRepository

    Public Sub New()
        Me.ticketRepo = New MaintenanceTicketsRepository(New TicketContext)
    End Sub

    Function Chart_OpenItems() As ActionResult
        Dim tickets As IList(Of MaintenanceTicket) = ticketRepo.GetAll().Include(Function(p) p.Priority).Include(Function(s) s.Status).OrderBy(Function(o) o.PriorityId).ToArray()
         'Do some work with repo then dispose'
    End Function

    Function Chart_ClosedItems() As ActionResult
        Dim tickets As IList(Of MaintenanceTicket) = ticketRepo.GetAll().Include(Function(p) p.Priority).Include(Function(s) s.Status).OrderBy(Function(o) o.PriorityId).ToArray()
         'Do some work with repo then dispose'
    End Function
End Class
share|improve this question
    
Stored procedures aren't any faster than a well-parametrized ad-hoc query ... just switching to stored procedures is most likely not going to get you any more speed. You need to find the performance bottlenecks (bad queries, missing indexes) - rather than wasting your time rewriting everything to stored procedures... – marc_s Dec 17 '12 at 17:05
    
I see, was afraid of that. When using EF Profiler it shows that for each of my chart control calls that hit my repo I am returning 1800 rows which each are about 1-3 seconds totally 5-6 seconds for total load time. Is there a way to return the repo just once and use instances of it for each chart hit? Would that gain me? – Chuck Dec 17 '12 at 17:07
1  
I disagree with it feels wrong to implement a stored procedure. If you are moving around 1800 rows and aggregating it into a single value or set of values I would think a stored procedure is a reasonable and prudent thing to do. Let SQL do what it is good at, aggregating data. i.e. if 'Do some work with repo then dispose' just means .Count() then implement a SP. If it is more complex than that you might want to keep it in classes. – PlTaylor Dec 17 '12 at 17:20
1  
@PlTaylor: I'm saying just changing from using queries to return 1800 rows to using stored procedures to return the same 1800 rows isn't gonna make things faster. But you're right - if Chuck can rewrite his logic and by using stored procedure do some of the work on the server and only return 50 rows instead of 1800 - then a stored procedure will make sense, for sure. But that's because you've changed the logic .. – marc_s Dec 17 '12 at 17:24
2  
@marc_s I agree completely. Stored procedures start to make sense if it reduces the amount of data being delivered to the model. – PlTaylor Dec 17 '12 at 17:27
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Trying to answer your question. If you can reduce the amount of data going to your Model by using a stored procedure to aggregate the data before it leaves SQL Server then go for it. The actual implementation details will depend on what kind of ORM setup you have. If you can reduce the 1800 rows to >100 you will almost certainly see a speed increase.

share|improve this answer
    
I am going to try this and see how it works out. I said it feels wrong, but cause from that purist mentality I wanted to do everything without using anything from SQL direct. – Chuck Dec 17 '12 at 18:08
1  
Use the tools for what they are good at. C# (and other programming languages) are great for complex logic. SQL is fantastic at storing data, retrieving and aggregating it. – PlTaylor Dec 17 '12 at 19:03
    
I am marking the answer here, thanks so much for your help guys. I agree with you on using the tools for what they are good at, and my testing proved it. I have a lot of work to finish, but in one query I have gone from 700ms+ to 10-20. – Chuck Dec 17 '12 at 21:59
2  
Glad to see it worked out. If there was ever an argument for learning the whole stack this is it. – PlTaylor Dec 18 '12 at 0:24

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