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I made this sketch in photoshop and I am converting it to HTML & CSS.

enter image description here

HTML:

<div class="pricebox">
    <p class="price">360kr</p>
    <p class="min">40 min</p>
    <p class="info green">Körlektion</p>
</div>

<div class="pricebox">
    <p class="price">1700kr</p>
    <p class="min">Riskutbildnig 2</p>
    <p class="info yellow">Halkan</p>
</div>  
<div class="pricebox">
    <p class="price">500kr</p>
    <p class="min">Riskutbildning 1</p>
    <p class="info red">Riskettan</p>
</div>  

CSS

body {
    font-family: "Myriad Pro",Myriad,"Helvetica Neue",Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;
}
.pricebox {
    display:inline-block;
    border: 1px solid #EEEEEE;
    border-radius: 3px;
    width: 100px;
    height: 150px;
    margin: 5px;
}

.price{
    font-size: 28px;
    font-weight:300;
    color: #383838;
    padding: 11px;
}
.min {
    font-size: 11px;
    color: #909090;
    padding: 0 25px;
}
.info {
    height: 35%;
    margin-top: 15px;
    color: #EEEEEE;
    font-weight: 600;
    font-size: 11px;
}
.green{background-color: #a7d155;}
.yellow{background-color: #eada42;}
.red{background-color: #e54e4b;}

But I am kinda lost on how to structure everything up, should use span or div tag instead of p-tags.

Check this jsfiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/upas3/1/

Any ideas or solutions are welcome.

share|improve this question
3  
definitely divs – redDevil Dec 17 '12 at 17:39
    
what are the function of these images – Eric Goncalves Dec 17 '12 at 17:39
1  
this is personal prefer, I would use spans or divs as they will require less overrides – dmi3y Dec 17 '12 at 17:40
    
Showing prices for a traffic school – SHUMAcupcake Dec 17 '12 at 17:40
    
What you have done will work. Just make sure the <p> tags are properly placed using CSS. – ATOzTOA Dec 17 '12 at 17:40

10 Answers 10

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I would use DL list for each such block and UL list to group them together semantically:

<ul>
    <li><dl>
        <dt>Körlektion</dt>
        <dd>360kr</dd>
        <dd>40 min</dd>
    </dl></li>

    <li><dl>
        <dt>Halkan</dt>
        <dd>1700kr</dd>
        <dd>Riskutbildnig 2</dd>
    </dl></li>

    <li><dl>
        <dt>Riskettan</dt>
        <dd>500kr</dd>
        <dd>Riskutbildning 1</dd>
    </dl></li>
</ul>
share|improve this answer
    
that looks like a great idea, it very clean. Could you provide a jsfiddle? – SHUMAcupcake Dec 17 '12 at 18:00
    
This is a better answer than the one selected. The selected answer does not consider semantics, where this answer does. – Scott Simpson Dec 17 '12 at 18:13
    
@ScottSimpson You are right – SHUMAcupcake Dec 17 '12 at 18:28

Looks like a good place to use ul and li tags. Using paragraph tags can work but is counter intuitive for UI design.

share|improve this answer
    
Using a list might not be such a bad idea, especially is each pricebox was a list item itself - how much added semantic value this would bring, I do not know (and it would require yet more overrides) – Sean Dunwoody Dec 17 '12 at 17:43

Well, div and p are "the same" in that they are block elements, but p has more default styling, so as between them, you will want to use div.

You might use span if you want these blocks to be treated as one line of text, which it kind of looks like you do.

Update: As noted in other answers, you could also use various list tags, and style them to be inline elements, like span. That can be nice for screen readers.

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting, I think i would go with a with a list tag element. Could you provide a jsfiddle? – SHUMAcupcake Dec 17 '12 at 17:57
    
@SHUMAcupcake (a) look at the other answers; (b) google this completely standard technique. – Marcin Dec 17 '12 at 17:59
    
@Marchin I will. Thank you. – SHUMAcupcake Dec 17 '12 at 18:02
3  
You aren't supposed to pick a tag based on what it looks like by default. You pick it based on its semantic meaning: p has a specific meaning, div has none. – cimmanon Dec 17 '12 at 18:39
1  
@Marcin the W3C has a fair bit to say about how to use tags appropriately. – cimmanon Dec 17 '12 at 18:53

This looks like tabular data, and tabular data goes in tables. However, that doesn't mean it has to look like a table!

http://jsfiddle.net/jdEP4/

table.prices {
    display: block;
}

table.prices thead {
    display: none;
}

table.prices tr {
    display: inline-block;
    border: 1px solid;
}

table.prices td {
    display: block;
    text-align: center;
}

.info.yellow {
    background: yellow;
}

.info.green {
    background: green;
}

.info.red {
    background: red;
}

The CSS is incomplete, of course, but the baseline is there for reformatting the table.

share|improve this answer
    
I totally agree. Semantically, a table is the right choice. Unfortunately, styling the table in IE in the way necessary just can't be made to work. – Alohci Dec 17 '12 at 19:08
    
It works fine in IE8+. IE7 and older is nearly extinct. The document should make sense without styling at all. Browsers who can't cope with modern styling techniques should still be functional and reasonably attractive. – cimmanon Dec 17 '12 at 19:13

Generally speaking there is no unified format, so you may use just whatever you feel better. Practically I am always trying use elements which will require less workaround. Let's say p tag will require additional margin normalization, so I would use instead divs, if you need inilne element probably better would be use span not div and so on. Just one thing which annoys me a lot it class/id names, always trying avoid somethign like size1, size2, style124 :) and use instead something that makes sense in context and will be understandable by other developers

share|improve this answer

Try this one: http://jsfiddle.net/P4xwK/

About your question I think that does not really matter you can convert every that to that you like with display:inline and with display:block. However the order of the tags should be syntactically correct.

Except that little triangle that looks like you want.

body {
    font-family: "Myriad Pro",Myriad,"Helvetica Neue",Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;
}
.pricebox {
    display:inline-block;
    border: 1px solid #EEEEEE;
    border-radius: 3px;
    width: 100px;
    height: 100px;
    margin: 5px;
}

.price{
    font-size: 28px;
    font-weight:300;
    color: #383838;
    text-align:center;
}
.min {
    font-size: 11px;
    color: #909090;
    text-align:center;
}
.info {
    height: 35%;
    margin-top: 15px;
    padding-top:15px;
    color: #EEEEEE;
    font-weight: 600;
    font-size: 11px;
    text-align:center;
}
.green{background-color: #a7d155;}
.yellow{background-color: #eada42;}
.red{background-color: #e54e4b;}

This here is a trick to paint a triangle with css:

.arrow-up {
    width: 0; 
    height: 0; 
    border-left: 5px solid transparent;
    border-right: 5px solid transparent;
    border-bottom: 5px solid black;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
even if you can change the display behavior of html containers, you should never do it for consistency and transparency reasons. – s1lence Dec 17 '12 at 18:10
    
@rekire Where should I put the .arrow-up class? – SHUMAcupcake Dec 17 '12 at 18:11
    
You could insert another tag or better use a pseudo class like before or after to one of your other classes. – rekire Dec 17 '12 at 19:33

I would organize it like so:

<div class="pricebox">
    <ul>
        <li class="price">360kr</li>
        <li class="min">40 min</li>
        <li class="info green">Körlektion</li>
    </ul>
</div>

then style accordingly.

share|improve this answer
    
div-itus --- .pricebox and block-level styling can go on the <ul> – Dawson Dec 17 '12 at 18:03

The only things that really matter here are author convenience and fallbacks.

For convenience, you would use div or span, which have no default rendering except for being block vs. inline, so there are no default settings you need to override.

For fallbacks, i.e. for non-CSS rendering, you would probably want to use p instead of div and span instead of div, since you want the items to be rendered as paragraphs (with empty lines or pauses between them) but internally just as text.

share|improve this answer

They look like list items to me. Not paragraphs. Programmatically, what you have is fine. Semantically, I'd try to think of them if CSS were shut off (That's why I'd make them a list)

<ul>
    <li><h2>Header</h2></li>
    <li>Price</li>
    <li>Description</li>
</ul>

Couple of things: 1) I try to target the elements, but using ".pricelist" on the <ul> tags would be an option. 2) If I'm correct in thinking that "Header" is important, than you could use positioning on the <ul> and <li> elems to move the header to the last item for presentation, but maintain your semantics.

share|improve this answer

I like more semantic solutions:

HTML:

<dl class="pricebox">
    <dt>Körlektion</dt>
    <dd><abbr class="price" title="360 kronor">360kr</abbr></dd>
    <dd><abbr class="min" title="40 minutes">40 min</abbr></dd>
</dl>
<dl class="pricebox">
    <dt>Halkan</dt>
    <dd><abbr class="price" title="1700 kronor">1700kr</abbr></dd>
    <dd><abbr class="min" title="2 FrihDehBiDeUh">Riskutbildnig 2</abbr></dd>
</dl>  
<dl class="pricebox">
    <dt>Riskettan</dt>
    <dd><abbr class="price" title="500 kronor">500kr</abbr></dd>
    <dd><abbr class="min" title="1 FrihDehBiDeUh">Riskutbildning 1</abbr></dd>
</dl>

Inspired by @MaratTanalin solution

In CSS:

Replace .green, .yellow and .red by dl:nth-of-type(1) dt, dl:nth-of-type(2) dt and dl:nth-of-type(3) dt except if the choice of color depends on something else than the position of the pricebox.

share|improve this answer
    
Great answer... Where is some text? – rekire Dec 17 '12 at 17:54
1  
@rekire - not if OP is concerned with semantics. "The abbr element represents an abbreviation or acronym" (w3.org/TR/html5/text-level-semantics.html#the-abbr-element) – Dawson Dec 17 '12 at 18:08

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