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Wanted to know if it is possible to get the same type of design layout as pinterest or jQuery masonry using only the new flexbox layout. Here is as far as I got it:

.flex-container {
    display: -webkit-flex;
    display: flex;
    -webkit-flex-flow: row wrap;
    flex-flow: row wrap;
}
.item {
    width: 220px;
    height: 250px;
    margin: 10px auto;
    padding: 0;
    background: #ccc;
}
.item:nth-child(3n+2) {
    background: #aaa;
    height: 400px;
}

and the HTML I am just using a PHP loop to create 12 items

<?php
    for ($i=0; $i<=11; $i++) {
        echo '<div class="item"></div>';
    }
?>
share|improve this question
2  
Maybe jQuery Masonry plugin will do? –  Pavlo Dec 17 '12 at 18:42
    
@PavloMykhalov thats what I am going for but I am looking for a way to do it solely with flexbox –  kricket Dec 17 '12 at 23:15
    
Check out Masonry CSS (multiple columns rather than flex). –  Pavlo Dec 21 '12 at 19:58
1  
@PavloMykhalov right and I have seen all those and they work great, but with flexbox supposedly built for layout I wanted to find a way with only flexbox. –  kricket Dec 21 '12 at 20:16
1  
@PavloMykhalov Just wanted to know if it was possible –  kricket Dec 24 '12 at 16:09

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It is entirely possible.

Thanks to @leopld's original answer, I was able to create one that does not depend on a fixed height.

By making the flex container position: absolute or position: fixed, you are able to get it to fill the available space dynamically.

Link to the Codepen: http://codepen.io/anon/pen/Jpnyj?editors=110. I included all the vendor prefixes you'd need at this time.

Markup

<div class="wrapper">
    <div class="box box-red"></div>
    <div class="box box-blue"></div>
    <div class="box box-pink"></div>
    <div class="box box-purple"></div>
    <div class="box box-green"></div>
    <div class="box box-yellow"></div>
    <div class="box box-brown"></div>
    <div class="box box-red"></div>
    <div class="box box-blue"></div>
    <div class="box box-pink"></div>
    <div class="box box-purple"></div>
    <div class="box box-green"></div>
    <div class="box box-purple"></div>
    <div class="box box-green"></div>
    <div class="box box-yellow"></div>
    <div class="box box-blue"></div>
    <div class="box box-pink"></div>
    <div class="box box-purple"></div>
    <div class="box box-green"></div>
    <div class="box box-yellow"></div>
    <div class="box box-red"></div>
    <div class="box box-brown"></div>
    <div class="box box-blue"></div>
    <div class="box box-red"></div>
    <div class="box box-green"></div>
    <div class="box box-yellow"></div>
    <div class="box box-brown"></div>
</div>

Styles

body {
    background: black;
}

.wrapper {
    position: absolute;
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
    display: -webkit-box;
    display: -webkit-flex;
    display: -ms-flexbox;
    display: flex;
    -webkit-flex-flow: column wrap;
    -ms-flex-flow: column wrap;
    flex-flow: column wrap;
    -webkit-box-align: stretch;
    -webkit-align-items: stretch;
    -ms-flex-align: stretch;
    align-items: stretch;
    -webkit-align-content: stretch;
    -ms-flex-line-pack: stretch;
    align-content: stretch;
}

.box {
    margin: 5px;
    -webkit-box-flex: 0;
    -webkit-flex: 0 1 auto;
    -ms-flex: 0 1 auto;
    flex: 0 1 auto;
}

.box-red {
    height: 100px;
    background: red;
}

.box-blue {
    height: 120px;
    background: blue;
}

.box-pink {
    height: 144px;
    background: pink;
}

.box-purple {
    height: 250px;
    background: purple;
}

.box-green {
    height: 200px;
    background: green;
}

.box-yellow {
    height: 20px;
    background: yellow;
}

.box-brown {
    height: 290px;
    background: brown;
}
share|improve this answer

You can actually do it without any greater hassle using flexbox. The only drawback is that you have to specify an absolute height for the wrapper, in order to make the content of it actually wrap. Otherwise it would all be laid out along one great, never ending column.

The HTML:

<div class="wrapper">
    <div class="red"></div>
    <div class="blue"></div>
    <div class="pink"></div>
    <div class="purple"></div>
    <div class="green"></div>
    <div class="yellow"></div>
    <div class="brown"></div>
</div>

The (unprefixed) CSS:

.wrapper {
    background: black;
    display: flex;
    flex-flow: column wrap;
    height: 450px;
    align-items: center;
}

.wrapper > div {
    height: 100px;
    margin: 5px;
    width: 100px;
}

.wrapper > :nth-child(3n+2) {
    border: 2px solid white;
    height: 300px;
}

I made a JS Fiddle as well, so you can see the result directly.

In a nutshell however, the trick is to use flex-direction: column in combination with flex-wrap: wrap and a fixed height for the wrapper.

I have to add, though - this seems like just the scenario that the CSS columns spec was written for, so KatieK's solution might be a better way to go. Above all, one doesn't need to specify a fixed height for the wrapper when using CSS columns instead of flexbox.

share|improve this answer

CSS3's columns will get you pretty close to that layout. (Note that support in non-recent browsers may be poor, and the spec may change in the future.) The other example didn't work with FF, but this one does:

HTML:

<div id="wrapper">
    <div id="cols">
        <div class="item">
          <img src="http://placekitten.com/400/700?image=1" />
            <p>0) Craft beer farm-to-table.</p>
        </div>
        <div class="item">
            <img src="http://placekitten.com/400/450?image=2" />
            <p>1) Mollit wolf veniam, leggings art party semiotics Brooklyn High Life sustainable occaecat Banksy actually.</p>
        </div>
        [more items]
    </div>
</div>

CSS:

h1, h2, ul, p { margin: 1rem; }

#wrapper {
    width: 900px;    
    margin: 20px auto;
    padding: 10px;
    outline: solid black 1px;
    background-color: gainsboro;  
}

#cols {
    -webkit-column-count: 3;
    -webkit-column-gap: 10px;
    -moz-column-count: 3;
    -moz-column-gap: 10px;
    column-count: 3;
    column-gap: 10px;
}

.item {
    display: inline-block;
    background: #FEFEFE;
    margin: 0;
    -webkit-column-break-inside: avoid;
    -moz-column-break-inside: avoid;
    column-break-inside: avoid;
    padding: 10px;
}

.item img {
    width: 100%;
    border-bottom: 1px solid black;
    padding-bottom: 10px;
    margin-bottom: 5px;
}

.item p {
    font-size:small;
    margin: 0;
}

Or play with the full example.

share|improve this answer

Update: To my knowledge, there is no way of doing this with Flexbox. Flexbox is more concerned with horizontal layout, not vertical. I would be happy to be proven wrong, but that’s what I’ve gathered from my limited experience with it. If you want to learn more, the best article I’ve found on the matter is this: http://css-tricks.com/snippets/css/a-guide-to-flexbox/ (Yes, of course it’s Chris Coyier. How’d you ever guess?)

In any case, even if you can do it with Flexbox it would be a bit of a hack, because that isn’t what Flexbox is for. There’s a much cleaner way of doing it with CSS3 columns. Here’s an example.

Browser support isn't the greatest though: http://caniuse.com/#search=column%20layout Even this example doesn't seem to support Firefox, although I haven't a clue why, since FF does indeed support the respective properties, according to CanIUse.

So, a summary and TLDR: it's an admirable idea, doing this in pure CSS, but for most practical purposes is impossible at the moment. You would probably be better to go with JQuery Masonry

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, Timothy. Just trying to get an idea of how it could be possible. –  kricket Jan 10 '13 at 20:04
    
I down voted only because this answer doesn't attempt to answer the flexbox question. It would be nice to have a more definitive answer (even if the answer is no). –  Arx Poetica Oct 16 '13 at 12:12
    
@AmericanYak Good point, I updated it to better address the actual question. –  Timothy Miller Oct 21 '13 at 20:41

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