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This might be a duplicate but I had little success in finding the right answer. I'm trying to achieve something like this :

var joinArrays = function(myCollectionOfArguments) {
    return array.concat(array1, array2, ..... , arrayN);
};

In which case myCollectionOfArguments will be array1, array2, ..... , arrayN. How could I achieve something like that ? I do know that if I had a callback function I cold pass as many arguments as I would like using .apply(), but in this certain case I'm a bit confused on the approach.

EDIT : So, to be more descriptive : Instead of passing just one argument, I would to be able to pass as many as I want without having to specify it when I define the function's arguments, in my case myCollectionOfArguments, would be just one argument when defining the function, but when I want to use the function I want to be able to pass more than one argument ;

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Why do you think you would need a callback function for apply? Show us how you tried to use it; an example invocation of joinArrays could help as well –  Bergi Dec 17 '12 at 17:53
    
"something like this" is actually not descriptive enough. –  Marat Tanalin Dec 17 '12 at 17:53
    
So, to be more descriptive : Instead of passing just one argument, I would to be able to pass as many as I want without having to specify it when I define the function's arguments, in my case myCollectionOfArguments, would be just one argument when defining the function, but when I want to use the function I want to be able to pass more than one argument ; –  rolandjitsu Dec 17 '12 at 17:55

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If I get your intention right, try:

var joinArrays = function(a) {
  return a.concat.apply(a, Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 1));
};

var foo = joinArrays([1, 2], [3, 4], [5, 6]);

console.log(foo); // => [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6] 
share|improve this answer
    
Exactly @Yoshi :) –  rolandjitsu Dec 17 '12 at 17:58
    
Why use one explicit parameter? (OK, you could also join strings with that, but…) –  Bergi Dec 17 '12 at 18:02
    
@Bergi no real reason ;) –  Yoshi Dec 17 '12 at 18:03
    
@Bergi ~ I have no idea :)) I just realized that I don't need one, just that it tells me that it accepts arguments I guess –  rolandjitsu Dec 17 '12 at 18:03

You can use the arguments object for an arbitrary amount of arguments, and you can even pass that directly into .apply:

var joinArrays = function() {
    return [].concat.apply([], arguments);
};

Btw, using bind would be more elegant here:

var joinArrays = Array.prototype.concat.bind([]);
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Bind is ECMAScript 5 though, ya? Not compatible with older browsers if that's something to consider. –  AlienWebguy Dec 17 '12 at 18:03
    
Yeah, but easy and uncomplicated to shim. My motto: Use it without caution, and simply add the polyfill if someone complains :-) Browsers lacking support for it are the minority today. –  Bergi Dec 17 '12 at 18:06
    
Depends on the website or application. I worked at Dictionary.com last year and still over 60% of their traffic came from IE8. While bind is more elegant, your ECMAScript 4 solution is only a few more characters so in this case I wouldn't even think to use bind. –  AlienWebguy Dec 17 '12 at 18:10
function testFunction()
{
    var arg1 = arguments[0];
    var arg2 = arguments[1];
    var arg3 = arguments[2];
}
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Not sure I understand, but you can pass arbitrary number of arrays:

joinArrays([1,2,3], [4,5,6], [7,8], [9,10,11,12])

and later read all of them using special arguments variable inside joinArrays().

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