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I have 2 tables. I want to check if column of table 1 dont have dubplicates in column of table2. This is scheme how search would work ! http://i.stack.imgur.com/fuopN.jpg

If no dubplicates are found I want to get row's name from table1.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

If I got you right, this is what you want.

SELECT 
    t1.name 
FROM 
    Table1 t1 
WHERE 
    t1.name 
NOT IN (
    SELECT 
        t2.name 
    FROM 
        Table2 t2) 
share|improve this answer
    
could you give me a sheme of your tables and specify what fields you want to not to be equal? – Theolodis Dec 17 '12 at 18:20
    
Oh wait, i think it might be working now, i tried with "IN" instead of "NOT IN" – user1876234 Dec 17 '12 at 18:21
    
But if you take IN you actually get the duplicates. – Theolodis Dec 17 '12 at 18:22
    
Alright i tried it with "NOT IN" and the result was all rows of table1 – user1876234 Dec 17 '12 at 18:31
    
what rows do you have in each table? give me some more information ;) – Theolodis Dec 17 '12 at 18:33

You need to specify a column (or columns) that you will use to "match" the rows, to determine whether they are "duplicates".

I'm going to assume (absent any schema information), that the column name is id.

An "anti-join" pattern is usually the best performing option:

SELECT a.id
  FROM table1 a
  LEFT
  JOIN table2 b
    ON a.id = b.id
 WHERE b.id IS NULL

(Performance is dependent on a whole bunch of factors.)

Your other options are to use a NOT EXISTS predicate:

SELECT a.id
  FROM table1 a
 WHERE NOT EXISTS
       ( SELECT 1
           FROM table2 b
          WHERE b.id = a.id
       )

Or, use a NOT IN predicate:

SELECT a.id
  FROM table1 a
 WHERE a.id NOT IN
       ( SELECT b.id
           FROM table2 b
          WHERE b.id IS NOT NULL
       )

The generated execution plan and performance of each of these statements will likely differ. With large sets, the "anti-join" pattern (the first query) usually performs best.

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