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There are two sentnecs in "test.txt"

sentence1 = A sentence is a grammatical unit consisting of one or more words.

sentence2 = A sentence can also be defined in orthographic terms alone.

count_line = 0
for line in open('C:/Users/Desktop/test.txt'):
    count_line = count_line +1
    fields = line.rstrip('\n').split('\t')
    ##print count_line, fields
    file = open('C:/Users/Desktop/test_words.txt', 'w+')
    count_word = 0
    for words in fields:
        wordsplit = words.split()
        for word in wordsplit:
             count_word = count_word + 1
             print count_word, word
             file.write(str(count_word) + " " + word + '\n')
        file.close()

My result in "test_words.txt" showed only the words from second sentence:

1 A 
2 sentence
3 can
4 also
5 be
6 defined
7 in
8 orthographic
9 terms
10 alone.

How to also write the words from the first sentence in and follow by the words in second sentence "test_words.txt" ?

Any suggestion?

share|improve this question
    
You did write the first sentence as well. But in the second iteration of your loop, you erased the file's contents when opening it with w+. –  Carsten Dec 17 '12 at 18:30

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The reason this is happening is because when you open the file for the second time, you dont preserve the original text inside it. When you open a file and write to it in Python, you basically overwrite its contents unless you store them in a variable and re-write them.

Try this code:

count_line = 0
for n, line in enumerate(open('test.txt')):
    count_line = count_line +1
    fields = line.rstrip('\n').split('\t')
    ##print count_line, fields
    already_text = open('test_words.txt').read() if n > 0 else ''
    file = open('test_words.txt', 'w+')
    count_word = 0
    file.write(already_text)
    for words in fields:
        wordsplit = words.split()
        for word in wordsplit:
             count_word = count_word + 1
             print count_word, word
             file.write(str(count_word) + " " + word + '\n')
        file.close()

Here's the output when i run it:

1 A
2 sentence
3 is
4 a
5 grammatical
6 unit
7 consisting
8 of
9 one
10 or
11 more
12 words.
1 A
2 sentence
3 can
4 also
5 be
6 defined
7 in
8 orthographic
9 terms
10 alone.

Here's code without enumerate():

count_line = 0
n = 0
for line in open('test.txt'):
    count_line = count_line +1
    fields = line.rstrip('\n').split('\t')
    ##print count_line, fields
    already_text = open('test_words.txt').read() if n > 0 else ''
    file = open('test_words.txt', 'w+')
    count_word = 0
    file.write(already_text)
    for words in fields:
        wordsplit = words.split()
        for word in wordsplit:
             count_word = count_word + 1
             print count_word, word
             file.write(str(count_word) + " " + word + '\n')
        file.close()
    n += 1
share|improve this answer
    
Output is correct but not in the txt file. Out put in txt file still be the same as I mentioned at the question. –  ThanaDaray Dec 17 '12 at 18:30
    
Sorry, i fixed it. Try running it now and see if it works. –  yentup Dec 17 '12 at 18:34
    
@ThanaDaray Does that work for you now? –  yentup Dec 17 '12 at 18:39
    
Enumerate is just an number to keep track of how many times. It just adds 1 to itself every time it goes in the loop. If you remove enumerate() just add n at the top like this: n = 0 and just do n += 1 at the end of the loop. –  yentup Dec 17 '12 at 18:41
    
I updated the code with a version without enumerate() –  yentup Dec 17 '12 at 18:42

In your code, you are opening and closing your output file multiple times causing your code to overwrite what you had written from the first sentence. The simple solution is to open only once and close only once.

count_line = 0
# Open outside the loop
file = open('C:/Users/Desktop/test_words.txt', 'w+')
for line in open('C:/Users/Desktop/test.txt'):
    count_line = count_line +1
    fields = line.rstrip('\n').split('\t')
    ##print count_line, fields
    count_word = 0
    for words in fields:
        wordsplit = words.split()
        for word in wordsplit:
            count_word = count_word + 1
            print count_word, word
            file.write(str(count_word) + " " + word + '\n')
# Also close outside the loop
file.close()
share|improve this answer

This might be irrelevant but I would suggest you to write that using a cleaner method. you dont need to have 3 loops:

lines = open('test.txt').readlines()
file = open('test_words.txt', 'w+')
for line in lines:
  words = line.rstrip('\n').split()

  for i, word in enumerate(words):
    print i, word
    file.write('%d %s\n' % (i+1, word))
file.close()
share|improve this answer

When possible, you should use with when dealing with files - it is a context manager and ensures that they are closed properly once you are done with them (which is indicated by leaving the indented block). Here we use enumerate with the optional start argument supplied - this is one way (of a few) to keep the counter going as it moves to the next line:

# Open the file
with open('test.txt', 'rb') as f:
  # Open the output (in Python 2.7+, this can be done on the same line)
  with open('text_words.txt', 'wb') as o:
    # Set our counter
    counter = 1
    # Iterate through the file
    for line in f:
      # Strip out newlines and split on whitespace
      words = line.strip().split()
      # Start our enumeration, which will return the index (starting at 1) and
      # the word itself
      for index, word in enumerate(words, counter):
        # Write the word to the file
        o.write('{0} {1}\n'.format(index, word))
      # Increment the counter
      counter += len(words)

Or if you want fewer lines - this uses readlines() to read the file into a list with items delimited by newlines. Then, the lines themselves are split on whitespace and each word is pulled out. This means that you basically iterate over a list of all of the words in the file, and in combination with enumerate you don't need to increment a counter as it is done for you:

# Open the file
with open('test.txt', 'rb') as f:
  # Open the output (in Python 2.7+, this can be done on the same line)
  with open('text_words.txt', 'wb') as o:
    # Iterate through the file
    for i, w in enumerate((x for l in f.readlines() for x in l.strip().split()), 1):
      o.write('{0} {1}\n'.format(i, w))

Using Python 2.7:

# Open the file
with open('test.txt', 'rb') as f, open('text_words.txt', 'wb') as o:
  # Iterate through the file
  for i, w in enumerate((x for l in f.readlines() for x in l.strip().split()), 1):
    o.write('{0} {1}\n'.format(i, w))
share|improve this answer

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