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1) set connection using method in class

//controller
using(Connection conn = new Connection()){
 conn.Open();
 MyClass myclass = new MyClass();
 myclass.setDbConnection(conn);
}

//MyClass in Model
class MyClass {
    Connection conn;

    public setDbConnection(conn){
        this.conn = conn;
    }

    public updateTableA(){
        //using this.conn;
    }
    public updateTableB(){
        //using this.conn;
    }
    public updateTableC(){
        //using this.conn;
    }

}

2) pass connection to each method as parameter

//controller
using(Connection conn = new Connection()){
 conn.Open();
 MyClass myclass = new MyClass();
}


//MyClass in Model
class MyClass {

    public updateTableA(Connection conn){
        //using conn;
    }
    public updateTableB(Connection conn){
        //using conn;
    }
    public updateTableC(Connection conn){
        //using conn;
    }
}

Which is right(or better) way? and why?

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2  
Answer: Use Entity Framework. –  SLaks Dec 17 '12 at 19:08
    
I agree with SLaks... Using EF is the best way with MVC. –  Oluwafemi Dec 17 '12 at 19:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Given your two option I would definitely go with the first one - there is absolutely no additional value in passing the connection to every method (assuming you are always using the same connection). This just adds a lot of noise to your code obscuring the actual business logic.

Further I would suggest to pass the connection to the constructor and avoid the setDbConnection method. This ensures you have a working object after calling the constructor and not one that will fail until you call this method. But this is not always possible and therefore such an initialization method is sometimes unavoidable.

Finally you should think about implementing IDisposable because your class holds an disposable resource - the connection - and may therefore be responsible to release it at the end of their lifetime.

And I definitely support what other users already said - think about using an OR-mapper like Entity Framework because rolling your own data access layer is really not trivial.

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The answer is that there really isn't a good approach to this because the pattern is inherently flawed. Your data objects should not be held responsible for maintaining the database connection nor should it be so tightly coupled with your database design. Object relational managers have proven themselves to be a much better approach for most database applications. You should look into one of the popular ones like Entity Framework or nHibernate. Personally I use nHibernate.

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1  
+1. This is like asking whether it is better to serve black burned steak or burned spaghetti - dude, better get the cooking basics down. The posters approacs are BOTH so flawed it is not even funny. –  TomTom Dec 17 '12 at 19:14
    
@Spencer Ruport Sorry but I couldn't understand well, I don't think the #2 way does not held responsible for maintaining the database connection. I understand using ORM is better, but without using ORM, I'd like to know the right pattern you mention it. could you help me a little more please? –  Expert wanna be Dec 18 '12 at 12:31

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