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Java local variable visibility in anonymous inner classes - why is ‘final’ keyword required?

I have this function that creates some buttons. I'm trying to out.println item in the doAction method.

    for (int i = 0; i < itemsList.size(); i++) {
        String item = itemsList.get(i);
        TButton button = new TButton("" + item, 8, 415 + (25 * i), 90, 25) {
            public void doAction() {
                System.out.println("" + item);
            }
        };
        this.framework.add(button);
    }

I'm getting the error

local variable item is accessed from within inner class

How do I do this the right way?

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marked as duplicate by Woot4Moo, Lews Therin, jschoen, Frank van Puffelen, Wouter J Dec 17 '12 at 22:13

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
I think if you declare item as final your code will work –  Hunter McMillen Dec 17 '12 at 19:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Making item final should solve your problem:

final String item = itemsList.get(i);

You can't access a non-final local variable from an inner or anonymous class like this.

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Mark item as final, this should resolve the issue. This solution :

Local classes can most definitely reference instance variables. The reason they cannot reference non final local variables is because the local class instance can remain in memory after the method returns. When the method returns the local variables go out of scope, so a copy of them is needed. If the variables weren’t final then the copy of the variable in the method could change, while the copy in the local class didn’t, so they’d be out of synch.

Anonymous inner classes require final variables because of the way they are implemented in Java. An anonymous inner class (AIC) uses local variables by creating a private instance field which holds a copy of the value of the local variable. The inner class isn’t actually using the local variable, but a copy. It should be fairly obvious at this point that a “Bad Thing”™ can happen if either the original value or the copied value changes; there will be some unexpected data synchronization problems. In order to prevent this kind of problem, Java requires you to mark local variables that will be used by the AIC as final (i.e., unchangeable). This guarantees that the inner class’ copies of local variables will always match the actual values.

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So this question is a duplicate.. –  Lews Therin Dec 17 '12 at 19:22
    
@LewsTherin I would say so, I have flagged it as such on OP –  Woot4Moo Dec 17 '12 at 19:22
    
@LewsTherin you may also move to close it so we can keep the site remotely clean. –  Woot4Moo Dec 17 '12 at 19:23
    
Yeah, done! +1 btw –  Lews Therin Dec 17 '12 at 19:24
    
@Woot4Moo "When the method returns the local variables go out of scope, so a copy of them is needed. If the variables weren’t final then the copy of the variable in the method could change, while the copy in the local class didn’t, so they’d be out of synch." If the method returns then the local variable is not used and it is removed. So there should not be synchronization with non-existing variable? –  Pawel Aug 9 '13 at 18:41

You need to use the final keyword.

Try final String item=itemsList.get(i);

Since the anonymous object captures the item variable, it doesn't make sense to modify it after. Hence you need (have) to make it immutable.

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