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I'm trying to remove endlines for all lines in my file where the endline splits two equal signs

ie:

1
a=
=b
2

to

1
a==b
2

I have

sed -i.bak -e 's/=\n    =//g' fileName

however, it doesn't seem to make any changes to my file. Is my script correct?

share|improve this question

Different seds on different OSs treat newlines in different ways. The most portable way to specify a newline in sed is to use backslash before a return:

sed -e 's/=\
=//g' file

BUT that's not going to work for you until you invoke some other magic sed characters to slurp up multiple lines into a buffer, etc....

Just use awk:

$ cat file
1
a=
=b
2
$ awk '{printf "%s%s", $0, (/=$/ ? "" : "\n")}' file
1
a==b
2

Just prints the current line followed by nothing if the current line ends in an "=" or a newline otherwise. Couldn't be simpler and it's highly portable....

Oh, and if you want to change your original file, that's just:

awk '{printf "%s%s", $0, (/=$/ ? "" : "\n")}' file > tmp && mv tmp file
share|improve this answer

This might work for you (GNU sed):

sed '$!N;s/=\n=/==/;P;D' file

or

sed -e '$!N' -e 's/='$"\n"'=/==/' -e 'P' -e 'D' file
share|improve this answer

Try this. It saves the whole file content in pattern space and the removes all newline characters between equal signs.

sed -i.bak -e ':a ; $! { N; b a }; s/=\n=/==/g' fileName

It yields:

1
a==b
2
share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't seem to work on my machine – blueberryfields Dec 17 '12 at 20:07
    
@blueberryfields: My info: GNU sed version 4.2.1 in Linux. Any error? – Birei Dec 17 '12 at 20:08
    
sed on mac os x 10.7.5, don't think it has a version number. No errors :( – blueberryfields Dec 17 '12 at 20:19
    
@blueberryfields: Sorry. I can't help with that. It seems that newlines are treated different in OS X, as I can read here. I don't know if it could be related to this answer. – Birei Dec 17 '12 at 20:38

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