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I have a Logs entity that has two inherited entities off of that. Each of the inherited entities links to another different entity. ResponseLog and SessionLog each connect to the Response, and Session entities respectively.

The Logs table has well over 700k records and is expected to grow to millions.

What I would like to do is take the top 100 entries from the logs table and put them into a list.

        var LogResults = (from entries in this.DbContext.LogEntries
                          orderby entries.TimeStamp descending
                          select entries).Take(nEntries);

However, when I do this List<LogEntry> LogResultList= LogResults.ToList(); it takes about 45 seconds to complete! I realize that the 'ToList' function is when the transaction with the database is actually made, but the length of time it takes is the same whether nEntries=100, 25, or 10000!

I looked at the query that linq generates and it appears to evaluate the type of every single log entry(700k+) in the Log table before pulling the top 100.

Is there any way to get the top 100, then figure out which inherited types just those records are?

here is the sql that is generated:

    SELECT TOP (100) 
[Project3].[C1] AS [C1], 
[Project3].[Id] AS [Id], 
[Project3].[Message] AS [Message], 
[Project3].[TimeStamp] AS [TimeStamp], 
[Project3].[UserId] AS [UserId], 
[Project3].[SeverityLevelRaw] AS [SeverityLevelRaw], 
[Project3].[C2] AS [C2], 
[Project3].[C3] AS [C3]
FROM ( SELECT 
    [Extent1].[Id] AS [Id], 
    [Extent1].[Message] AS [Message], 
    [Extent1].[TimeStamp] AS [TimeStamp], 
    [Extent1].[UserId] AS [UserId], 
    [Extent1].[SeverityLevelRaw] AS [SeverityLevelRaw], 
    CASE WHEN ( NOT (([Project1].[C1] = 1) AND ([Project1].[C1] IS NOT NULL))) THEN '0X' WHEN (([Project1].[C1] = 1) AND ([Project1].[C1] IS NOT NULL) AND ( NOT (([Project2].[C1] = 1) AND ([Project2].[C1] IS NOT NULL)))) THEN '0X0X' ELSE '0X0X0X' END AS [C1], 
    CASE WHEN ( NOT (([Project1].[C1] = 1) AND ([Project1].[C1] IS NOT NULL))) THEN CAST(NULL AS uniqueidentifier) WHEN (([Project1].[C1] = 1) AND ([Project1].[C1] IS NOT NULL) AND ( NOT (([Project2].[C1] = 1) AND ([Project2].[C1] IS NOT NULL)))) THEN [Project1].[SessionId] ELSE [Project1].[SessionId] END AS [C2], 
    CASE WHEN ( NOT (([Project1].[C1] = 1) AND ([Project1].[C1] IS NOT NULL))) THEN CAST(NULL AS uniqueidentifier) WHEN (([Project1].[C1] = 1) AND ([Project1].[C1] IS NOT NULL) AND ( NOT (([Project2].[C1] = 1) AND ([Project2].[C1] IS NOT NULL)))) THEN CAST(NULL AS uniqueidentifier) ELSE [Project2].[ResponseId] END AS [C3]
    FROM   [dbo].[LogEntries] AS [Extent1]
    LEFT OUTER JOIN  (SELECT 
        [Extent2].[SessionId] AS [SessionId], 
        [Extent2].[Id] AS [Id], 
        cast(1 as bit) AS [C1]
        FROM [dbo].[LogEntries_RuntimeLogEntry] AS [Extent2] ) AS [Project1] ON [Extent1].[Id] = [Project1].[Id]
    LEFT OUTER JOIN  (SELECT 
        [Extent3].[ResponseId] AS [ResponseId], 
        [Extent3].[Id] AS [Id], 
        cast(1 as bit) AS [C1]
        FROM [dbo].[LogEntries_ResponseLogEntry] AS [Extent3] ) AS [Project2] ON [Extent1].[Id] = [Project2].[Id]
)  AS [Project3]
ORDER BY [Project3].[TimeStamp] DESC
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Please post the TSQL that is generated. –  Frisbee Dec 17 '12 at 20:22
    
I agree that derived table, Project 3, is fully evaluated prior to the order by top 100. Sorry I don't know enough EF to fix this. –  Frisbee Dec 17 '12 at 20:36

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I suggest that you take a look at the execution plan. You are probably going to need to add an index on TimeStamp.

In Microsoft SQL Server Management Studio, mouse-over the icons above the query editor and click the one labelled "Include Actual Execution Plan". Then, rerun your query.

Notice that there is now a tab next to results called "Execution plan". This is a really great tool for troubleshooting queries that are taking too long. By mousing over the icons in the execution plan, generally from right to left, you can see how the database engine decided to accomplish your query and what is taking so long.

Joe Chang has an article, http://www.qdpma.com/cbo/s2kcbo_2a.html, that might help you understand the different types of execution steps you will find in a SQL Server execution plan. In general, you don't want to see much time in bulk scans or index scans (essentially searching top to bottom to find something). Instead, you want to see index seek operations (generally, a btree binary-ish search).

I expect that you will find that you are spending most of your time in a scan or a huge sort operation. Try adding an index on the TimeStamp column. I bet it will take your query down to sub-second in this case.

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