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I have a class A and a class B like this :

class A
{
public:
   A(){}
};

class B : public A
{
public:
   B() : A()
   {
      value = 10;
   }
   int Value()
   {
      return value;
   }

protected:
   int value;
}:

I have this code :

int main()
{
   A* a = new B();
   // how can I access to Value() ? I would like to make that :
   int val = a->Value();
   // must i cast a to B ? how ?
}

thanks for your help.

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4 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Make Value() a pure virtual function in A (also add a virtual destructor):

class A
{
public:
  A(){}
  virtual ~A(){}
  virtual int Value() = 0;
};
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1  
good to think about the virtual destructor! –  xtofl Dec 17 '12 at 20:49
1  
HerrJoebob is right. It is always good practice to make the root class pure abstract (en.wikibooks.org/wiki/C%2B%2B_Programming/Classes/…). It allows you to program to an interface (stackoverflow.com/questions/383947/…). –  Carl Dec 17 '12 at 20:58
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The thing is, Virtual() isn't inherited. It isn't defined in A.

declare Value() in A as a pure virtual.

virtual int Value() = 0;

You can't access Value() because as far as the compiler is concerned, there is no Value() function in A (which is the object type you are creating).

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Use virtual methods

class A
{
public:
   A(){}
   virtual int Value() = 0;
   virtual ~A(){}
};

class B : public A
{
public:
   B() : A()
   {
      value = 10;
   }
   int Value()
   {
      return value;
   }

protected:
   int value;
}:

Also keep in mind ( tell don't ask principle ).

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Do this instead:

B* b = new B();

If you need functionality of B make a B.

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