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I'm currently testing an interface for Java which enables to use R calls with Java. Therefore I need a connection which also encapsulates a process.
Now I need to know, how JUnit processes those Unit Tests. I'm using JUnit4 with it's @Before and @After annotations to init a new connection (internally it's a process) once per test.
With "how JUnit processes" I mean:

  • is every test executed in it's own thread? ( which could probably cause problems)
  • are those tests executed sequentially?
  • do they have a specific order (not that important, but would be nice to know)

My concern is that those tests could cause problems which wouldn't exist, if used properly (as documented) in a real environment.

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This may be somewhat useful: garygregory.wordpress.com/2011/09/25/… –  Chris Dec 17 '12 at 21:09
    
+1 for @Before/AfterClass as this was sth. I was looking for, too(some while ago though), but in this case I want every test to init it's own resource. –  Zhedar Dec 17 '12 at 21:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The tests are executed sequentially. You should not rely on this fact, because that indicates you are not writing a pure unit test and have created an anti-pattern (in terms of testing). Each test must be its own separate piece of work with no external dependencies outside of After and Before initializations. I believe each test is executed in its own thread, once again this harkens back to your test suite not being pure unit tests.

My concern is that those tests could cause problems which wouldn't exist, if used properly (as documented) in a real environment.

Unit tests only validate one small piece of a function, typically one possible logic branch. If you want to test the system integration you will need to do what is called integration testing. Further if you are looking to do multi-threaded testing I highly recommend: Multi-threaded TC

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I'm testing just single functions in those tests. But if they're executed in parallel the answers I get from the process can get mixed up. That's why I wanted to make sure it would work like I wanted it to. –  Zhedar Dec 17 '12 at 21:19
    
@Zhedar Ah yes, the before and after will deny any initialization from bleeding. –  Woot4Moo Dec 17 '12 at 21:26
    
Does that mean, that there won't be a new @Before-call(so a new tests preparing) before the last @After finished? This would make things quite easier. –  Zhedar Dec 17 '12 at 21:31
    
@Zhedar Per thread, there will be at most One before and One after, per unit test. Or more clearly each unit test will be run by at most one thread, which in turn will at invoke before and after one time. –  Woot4Moo Dec 17 '12 at 21:33

I believe that unless otherwise specified, JUnit is free to use as many threads as it likes to run your unit tests. You can restrict this to a single thread. The order is arbitrary as to which tests are run when. In theory, your tests should be properly thread-safe to avoid having nondeterminism issues if run from different threads.

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do you have some sources about restricting it to use just one thread? time isn't a crucial factor here, so this may be an option. –  Zhedar Dec 17 '12 at 21:21
  • is every test executed in it's own thread? ( which could probably cause problems) - one thread for all tests
  • are those tests executed sequentially? - yes
  • do they have a specific order (not that important, but would be nice to know) - no, it is principally impossible to tell beforehand the order of processing of @Test methods in the class. But using @Rules, you can read the number of the current test in their sequence

  • Of course, we are talking on different tests in one class.

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Timeouts break the "one thread for all tests" behavior, although they keep them sequential. –  ptyx Jan 2 '13 at 17:18
    
@ptyx Thank you, I'll look at it. –  Gangnus Jan 2 '13 at 17:37

For each test class:

  1. Call @BeforeClass and/or @ClassRule annotations.
  2. For each test (@Test):
    1. Create an instance of the class
    2. Call @Before and/or @Rule annotations
    3. Call test method
    4. Call @After and/or @Rule annotations
  3. Call @AfterClass or @ClassRule annotations.

Usually everything works from the same thread - however don't rely on that as some rules (timeout) will fork a thread - and you can decide to run tests in parallel.

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