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I´m doing a system where I join several tables in a query. In most circumstances the following kind of query does the trick:

     SELECT * FROM A JOIN B ON A.a = B.a JOIN C ON C.a = A.a WHERE A.a = 123;  

Attribute A.a is the PK and used as FK in B.a and C.a.

In some circumstances there are no corresponding B.a and C.a. In others just C.a is missing. As it is now, if there are no corresponding keys in B or C I get an empty set. As expected.

It would be convenient with a query that produces a set with attributes only for A if only A exists and adds B and C attributes if A.a = B.a etc.

I guess this requires a DBMS specific solution and not general SQL but I´m not sure.

Any ideas how this should be done if possible?

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You want an outer join. –  eggyal Dec 17 '12 at 21:32
    
That was exactly what I wanted! Thanks. –  Einar Dec 17 '12 at 21:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You want this:

SELECT *
FROM A LEFT OUTER JOIN
     B
     ON A.a = B.a LEFT OUTER JOIN
     C
    ON C.a = A.a
WHERE A.a = 123

The left outer join keeps all the records in the first table (the one on the "left") and any matching tables on the right. You can reference columns in any of the tables. If there is no match, then the value is NULL.

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Yes! That is exactly what I want. I have completely missed the concept of outer joins. Now I feel silly for something that seems a bit unresearched. –  Einar Dec 17 '12 at 21:45

This kind of join is called outer (as opposed to the default kind of join, which is called inner).

Here is how you tell SQL that you need an outer join:

SELECT * FROM A
LEFT OUTER JOIN B ON A.a = B.a
LEFT OUTER JOIN C ON C.a = A.a WHERE A.a = 123;  

This tells SQL that even when a corresponding rows of B or C (or both) are missing, you still want whatever rows that are available.

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