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I have this table:

CREATE TABLE Category
(
  LogId int NULL,
  Name varchar(30) NOT NULL
)

Two categories with different LogIds may have the same Name, but a category may not have the same name as a category with a null LogId.

Is there a way to enforce this constraint?

I tried creating a unique index on this view:

create view Category_LogId_Name
  with schemabinding
as
select
  LogId,
  Name
from
  dbo.Category
where
  LogId is null
union all 
select
  b.LogId,
  a.Name
from
  dbo.Category a
  cross join dbo.Log b
where
  a.LogId is null

But trying to create the index:

create unique clustered index un_Category_LogId_Name on Category_LogId_Name (LogId, Name)

produces this error:

Cannot create index on view 'Category_LogId_Name' because it contains one or more UNION, INTERSECT, or EXCEPT operators. Consider creating a separate indexed view for each query that is an input to the UNION, INTERSECT, or EXCEPT operators of the original view.

Is there a different approach?

share|improve this question
    
You could use a CHECK constraint for this, but they are not very performant. –  Oded Dec 17 '12 at 21:42
    
Yeah, I was hoping to avoid them. –  Daniel Dec 17 '12 at 21:43
    
Don't think you can, not for this requirement (unless you are willing to delegate checking to the application). –  Oded Dec 17 '12 at 21:45
    
That's where it's enforced now. Was hoping to move it to the database. –  Daniel Dec 17 '12 at 21:46
    
I suggest using a CHECK constraint and testing. It may be performant enough - you never know... –  Oded Dec 17 '12 at 21:48

1 Answer 1

If I am reading you right, you have two constraints:

  1. Category Name + LogId must be unique; if LogId is null, Name must be unique.
  2. A given Category Name may be associated with a non-null LogId, or a null LogId, but not both.

You enforce (1) with a vanilla UNIQUE constraint, like so:

alter table dbo.Category add constraint UQ_Category (Name, LogId)

Unlike PRIMARY KEY constraints, UNIQUE constraints allow nullable keys, and treat nulls as instances of the same "value". Thus, this data would be allowed:

insert dbo.Category (LogId, Name) values (null, 'Name1') -- ok
insert dbo.Category (LogId, Name) values (1, 'Name1') -- ok
insert dbo.Category (LogId, Name) values (2, 'Name1') -- ok
insert dbo.Category (LogId, Name) values (3, 'Name1') -- ok

but this would be rejected after the first insert:

insert dbo.Category (LogId, Name) values (null, 'Name1') -- ok
insert dbo.Category (LogId, Name) values (null, 'Name1') -- error
insert dbo.Category (LogId, Name) values (null, 'Name1') -- error
insert dbo.Category (LogId, Name) values (null, 'Name1') -- error

Then for (2), you need something to enforce exclusivity, so that if a Name is associated w/ a null LogId, it cannot be associated w/ a non-null LogId, and vice-versa. For this, you group by Name and the nullity of LogId in an indexed view:

create view dbo.MakeItExclusive
with schemabinding as
select Name
     , case when LogId is null then 1 else 0 end as HasNullLogIds
     , count_big(*) as _rowcount
from dbo.Category
group by Name
       , case when LogId is null then 1 else 0 end
go

create unique clustered index CU_MakeItExclusive on dbo.MakeItExclusive (Name)
go

Since the view has a GROUP BY clause, SQL Server requires COUNT_BIG(*) in the SELECT clause to create the index.

Beyond that, it's pretty straight-forward: group by Name and LogId-nullness, and then ensure that Name is unique in the results. If a Name were associated w/ both a null LogId and a non-null LogId, there would be two rows, violating the constraint.

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