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Possible Duplicate:
Parse DateTime with timezone of form PST/CEST/UTC/etc

OK, I have following code in Java that converts my Date object into String:

SimpleDateFormat dateFormat = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss zzz");
String str = dateFormat.format(new Date());
// outputs: 2012-12-17 15:44:57 CST

I am sending that String over the wire to WebService written in C#. So, how would I parse back that String into valid DateTime considering that following doesn't work because zzz in C# is different:

DateTime.ParseExact(parts[2], "yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss zzz", CultureInfo.InvariantCulture.DateTimeFormat);

And before anyone suggests it - I know I can go with UTC time, but I need to do it this way.

Any ideas?

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marked as duplicate by D Stanley, Frank van Puffelen, Oded, durron597, dreamcrash Dec 18 '12 at 1:44

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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Possible duplicates here, here, and here – D Stanley Dec 17 '12 at 21:55
    
Why do you need to do it this way? When calling the web service why not convert the date to whatever format you want? – Dave Zych Dec 17 '12 at 22:02
    
DAMN YOU CLOSE TROLLS - THIS IS NOT EXACTLY THE SAME AS IN THIS CASE WE WENT WITH NUMBERIC OFFSETS AND NOT TIMEZONE IDENTIFIERS. – kape123 Dec 18 '12 at 17:45
up vote 2 down vote accepted

CST is not a valid .NET timezone identifier.

In .NET, these are all numeric offsets - +0700, -0500 etc...

You will need to output a numeric timezone offset if you want it to be parsed by .NET.

I suggest using yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss Z in Java, as can be seen here.

The alternative is to convert CST to -0600 using string.Replace, but this is both not scalable and can fall over with the ambiguities of named timezones (CST can mean different timezones depending on where you are).

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You obviously haven't read this part: "So, how would I parse back that String into valid DateTime considering that following doesn't work because zzz in C# is different" – kape123 Dec 17 '12 at 21:56
    
@kape123 - You either change the Java to use Z instead of zzz or, in C# convert the named timezones to their numeric equivalents (though the named timezones are ambiguous) – Oded Dec 17 '12 at 21:58
    
Didn't know about Z - thanks! So Z on Java side, zzz on C# side and it works perfectly. – kape123 Dec 17 '12 at 22:10

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