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I need to convert a FASTA header from this format:

gi|351517969|ref|NW_003613580.1| Cricetulus griseus unplaced genomic scaffold, CriGri_1.0 scaffold329, whole genome shotgun sequence

to this:

NW_003613580.1 Cricetulus griseus unplaced genomic scaffold, CriGri_1.0 scaffold329, whole genome shotgun sequence

The W in NW can be a C in other addresses, and the number of digits after the underscore varies.

I found a perl script to change the IDs to a different format, and was trying to modify it. The relevant portion:

    while( $seq = $seq_in->next_seq() ) 
{
    my $seqName = $seq->id;
    $seqName =~ s/\|/\./g; #replace pipe with dot

        $seqName =~ s/(NW\_)/$1/;   

        #$seqName =~ s/(gi\.\w*)\..*/$1/; 

        $seq->id($seqName);
    $seq_out->write_seq($seq);
}

With the commented out seqname bit being the original. I was hoping changing the gi to NW would make it start reading later in the header but no dice. However, changing the $1 to random text does make it replace at the NW, so I'm not really sure. Also, the periods replacing the pipes seem to disappear without any logical reason (though I do want them gone). Any help, or at least some resources on how the search and replace is working here would be greatly appreciated.

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6 Answers 6

Split the components:

my @fastaHeaderComponents = split("\\|", $seq->id);

Then access them:

my $accessionId = $fastaHeaderComponents[3];
my $description = $fastaHeaderComponents[4];

and rebuild the header:

my $newFastaHeader = ">$accessionId $description";
$seq->id($newFastaHeader);
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You do not have to escape the | in a normal string, only in regexes. I think it should be split("|", $seq->id). –  mpe Dec 18 '12 at 11:21
    
I honestly thought so too, until I made a test script to try it out. –  Alex Reynolds Dec 18 '12 at 15:56
    
You're right... This is weird. Well, okay. You could use single quotes, then you only need one slash: split('\|', $seq->id) –  mpe Dec 18 '12 at 16:30
    
Good suggestion, thanks! –  Alex Reynolds Dec 18 '12 at 16:33
    
Added the leading header symbol > for FASTA files. –  Alex Reynolds Dec 20 '12 at 1:11

With a sed one-liner:

sed -r 's/^([^|]+\|){3}//;s/\|//' file

NW_003613580.1 Cricetulus griseus unplaced genomic scaffold, CriGri_1.0 scaffold329, whole genome shotgun sequence

The nice thing with a sed solution is you can specify which line to make the substitution on such as the first only with 1s and use the -i option to store the substitution back to the file:

sed -ri '1s/^([^|]+\|){3}//;1s/\|//' file

Regexplanation:

s/     # Substitution, 1s/ first line only, 2s/ second line..
^      # Match the start of the line
(      # Group pattern
[^|]+  # Match one or more character that isn't a |
\|     # Match the | (escaped)
)      # End grouped pattern
{3}    # Repeat grouped pattern 3 times
/      # Replace with 
/      # Nothing
;
s/     # Substitute, 1s/ first line only..
\|     # The remaining |
/      # Replace with
/      # Nothing 
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1  
Nice explanation. –  mpe Dec 18 '12 at 11:23

Perhaps the following will be helpful:

use strict;
use warnings;
use Bio::SeqIO;

my $seq_in  = Bio::SeqIO->new( -file => 'input.fas',   '-format' => 'Fasta' );
my $seq_out = Bio::SeqIO->new( -file => '>output.fas', '-format' => 'Fasta' );

while ( my $seq = $seq_in->next_seq ) {
    my $shortened_seq = Bio::Seq->new(
        -desc       => $seq->desc,
        -display_id => ( split /\|/, $seq->id )[-1]
    );

    $seq_out->write_seq($shortened_seq);
}

Given a FASTA header like the following as input:

>gi|351517969|ref|NW_003613580.1| Cricetulus griseus unplaced genomic scaffold, CriGri_1.0 scaffold329, whole genome shotgun sequence

It produces the following output:

>NW_003613580.1 Cricetulus griseus unplaced genomic scaffold, CriGri_1.0 scaffold329, whole genome shotgun sequence
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Short version: Break apart the sequence into an array, using split.

my @parts = split( /\|/, $seq );

Then build a string to display using the elements of the array.

print $parts[3], ' ', $parts[4], etc....
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This is just a matter of splitting the original header on pipe characters (surrounded by optional whitespace) and rejoing joining the required fields again

use strict;
use warnings;

my $header = 'gi|351517969|ref|NW_003613580.1| Cricetulus griseus unplaced genomic scaffold, CriGri_1.0 scaffold329, whole genome shotgun sequence';

$header = join ' ', (split /\s*\|\s*/, $header)[3,4];

print $header;

output

NW_003613580.1 Cricetulus griseus unplaced genomic scaffold, CriGri_1.0 scaffold329, whole genome shotgun sequence
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This might work for you (GNU sed):

sed -r 's/^([^|]*\|){3}(N[WC]_[0-9.]+)\|/\2/' file
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