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So ... using the Google App Engine User service.

Should I create a local user object:

my_user = users.get_current_user()
if not my_user:
    self.redirect(users.create_login_url(self.request.uri), abort=True)
    return
person = Person.get_current(my_user.user_id()) #Here

or access the user object from the users service anytime? :

my_user = users.get_current_user()
if not my_user:
    self.redirect(users.create_login_url(self.request.uri), abort=True)
    return
#...  code ...
person = Person.get_current(users.get_current_user().user_id()) #And here

or something else? :

helping useres :-)

and of course why. Is usage of users service costly in resources?

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Sorry for the edit's .... forgot to replace –  Jimmy Kane Dec 17 '12 at 23:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A locally scoped user object should be fine for each request.

Make sure my_user is local to your thread and the current request:

  • if it's shared between separate requests, there's no guarantee that it's really the same user issuing the request, unless you have some separate session validation.

  • different threads can be handling different request, in which case you run into the above problem.

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Thanks for the info. Before I get scared, if my_user is inside the request handler in def get() then is it possible to become globally accessible? I might be missing something here. I thought that every request handler has his own thread. –  Jimmy Kane Dec 19 '12 at 15:07
    
Every request gets its own thread. If my_user is inside def get() you're good. If it's outside and global, you can get problems. –  dragonx Dec 19 '12 at 15:10
    
No usage of course is not global. I would never do that and It would only be really stress tested. –  Jimmy Kane Dec 19 '12 at 15:12

A local call is always better as a call that triggers many method calls. The efficiency gain depends on the frequency your code is calling it. For 2 calls it's okay.

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