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Problem: I don't want to expose $myProperty, that is it shouldn't be public, but I need it to be public just for __toString():

class A
{
    protected $myProperty;

    public function __toString()
    {
        return json_encode($this);
    }
}

I know that ReflectionProperty class has a method named setAccessible(), but how I'm supposed to use it before returning the string?

EDIT: as per comments, I need compatibility with PHP 5.3.x, that is no JSonSerializable class.

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Psst: php.net/JsonSerializable –  hakre Dec 18 '12 at 0:46
2  
I'd better implement JsonSerializable interface in order to state clearly which fields will be serialized, and which not. –  moonwave99 Dec 18 '12 at 0:47
    
I'd have to say that setAccessible() probably falls under the category of "evil magic that you should never use". It's interesting, but should never be necessary in production code. –  duskwuff Dec 18 '12 at 0:47
    
@moonwave99 of course, BUT I need compatibility with 5.3.x. –  gremo Dec 18 '12 at 0:49
    
@gremo well that's basically the same - you don't implement the interface, and you call the method explicitly when you need it ^^ –  moonwave99 Dec 18 '12 at 0:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As per PHP 5.3 use get_object_vars inside the __toString() method:

public function __toString()
{
    return json_encode(get_object_vars($this));
}

Usage Demo:

class A
{
    protected $myProperty = 'hello';

    public function __toString()
    {
        return json_encode(get_object_vars($this));
    }
}

echo new A; 

Output:

{"myProperty":"hello"}

Tip: Create the JsonSerializable interface your own and implement the jsonSerialize() method your own to be upwards compatible. Call the function when you need it and/or call it inside __toString():

public function __toString()
{
    return json_encode($this->jsonSerialize());
}
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Interesting... this will work because the protected property is in the scope, right? –  gremo Dec 18 '12 at 0:52
    
Exactly. Will also give private properties. As well as with (array) $this but that one has unwanted side-effects so get_object_vars is better. –  hakre Dec 18 '12 at 0:56
    
Curious, is (object) cast here necessary? –  zerkms Dec 18 '12 at 1:04
    
@zerkms: technically not, because json_encode will it encode as json object because of non-numeric keys. Edited. (nice spot, thx) –  hakre Dec 18 '12 at 1:20

Why don't you simply build a PHP stdClass object and then serialize it to JSON, since when you deserialize from JSON, that is exactly what you get anyway.

Maybe something like this:

public function __toString() {
   $return = new stdClass();
   $properties = get_object_vars($this);
   foreach ($properties as $key => $value) {
       $return->$key = $value;
   }
   return json_encode($return);
}
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